Kinetics of alkali silicate and aluminosilicate glass reactions in alkali chloride solutions. Influence of surface charge

L. R. Pederson, B. P. McGrail, G. L. McVay, D. A. Petersen-Villalobos, N. S. Settles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Initial rates of alkali ion exchange from sodium trisilicate, potassium trisilicate, lithium disilicate, and several sodium aluminosilicate glasses were measured as a function of electrolyte concentration and pH (concentration scale) using pH-stat methods. For the alkali silicate glasses, rates of ion exchange were depressed in solutions of their respective alkali chlorides except near the isoelectric point (pH 2-3), where ion exchange rates in deionised water and in electrolytes were indistinguishable. Similar but smaller rate depressions were obtained for sodium aluminosilicate glasses in sodium chloride solutions. Trends in these initial rates were consistent with predictions of a model relating glass reaction kinetics to the surface concentration of hydrogen ions, which is a function of the electric surface potential at the glass/solution interface. Although not directly measurable, electric surface potentials were calculated as a function of electrolye concentration and pH using site-dissociation theory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)140-148
Number of pages9
JournalPhysics and Chemistry of Glasses
Volume34
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Silicates
Aluminosilicates
Alkalies
Surface charge
Chlorides
alkalies
silicates
chlorides
Glass
Kinetics
glass
kinetics
Ion exchange
Sodium
sodium
Surface potential
Electrolytes
electrolytes
ions
Deionized water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Ceramics and Composites

Cite this

Pederson, L. R., McGrail, B. P., McVay, G. L., Petersen-Villalobos, D. A., & Settles, N. S. (1993). Kinetics of alkali silicate and aluminosilicate glass reactions in alkali chloride solutions. Influence of surface charge. Physics and Chemistry of Glasses, 34(4), 140-148.

Kinetics of alkali silicate and aluminosilicate glass reactions in alkali chloride solutions. Influence of surface charge. / Pederson, L. R.; McGrail, B. P.; McVay, G. L.; Petersen-Villalobos, D. A.; Settles, N. S.

In: Physics and Chemistry of Glasses, Vol. 34, No. 4, 08.1993, p. 140-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pederson, LR, McGrail, BP, McVay, GL, Petersen-Villalobos, DA & Settles, NS 1993, 'Kinetics of alkali silicate and aluminosilicate glass reactions in alkali chloride solutions. Influence of surface charge', Physics and Chemistry of Glasses, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 140-148.
Pederson, L. R. ; McGrail, B. P. ; McVay, G. L. ; Petersen-Villalobos, D. A. ; Settles, N. S. / Kinetics of alkali silicate and aluminosilicate glass reactions in alkali chloride solutions. Influence of surface charge. In: Physics and Chemistry of Glasses. 1993 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 140-148.
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