Kerraboot® vs Allevyn for treating diabetic foot ulcers

Michael Edmonds, Ali Foster, Tim Jemmott, David Kerr, Rayaz Malik, Ann Knowles, Edward Jude, Paul Chadwick, Lufat Rahaman, Neil Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Diabetic ulcers are slow to heal and may result in amputation in 10-25% of patients. Kerraboot® was designed to encourage granulation, remove exudate away from the wound and enhance patient comfort during dressing changes. Aims: In this study of 32 patients, the acceptability of Kerraboot® for the management of diabetic foot ulcers was compared to standard wound care treatment, Allevyn™ by patients and healthcare workers. Methods: Questionnaires were completed by patients and healthcare workers to assess acceptability of dressing and impact on quality of life. Results: Kerraboot® was better than Allevyn™ in terms of ease of application and removal, convenience and resource utilisation. A 50% reduction in the time taken to change the dressing was noted in the Kerraboot® group (mean = 6.8, SD= 4.66 minutes vs Allevyn™, mean= 9.9, SD= 3.78 minutes; P=0.017). By the first week, 85.7% of the patients in the Kerraboot® group were able to change their dressing independently of nurses compared with 62.5% in the Allevyn™ group. Conclusions. Although there was no difference in healing rates between the groups, in the non-healing wounds there was a noticeable difference in the reduction of slough and increase in granulation tissue in the Kerraboot® group compared to Allevyn™. Declaration of interest.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-31
Number of pages7
JournalWounds UK
Volume2
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Diabetic Foot
Bandages
Wounds and Injuries
Delivery of Health Care
Granulation Tissue
Exudates and Transudates
Amputation
Ulcer
Nurses
Quality of Life
allevyn

Keywords

  • Diabetes nursing
  • Dressings
  • Leg ulcers
  • Patients: empowerment
  • Research and development
  • Wounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Edmonds, M., Foster, A., Jemmott, T., Kerr, D., Malik, R., Knowles, A., ... Murray, N. (2006). Kerraboot® vs Allevyn for treating diabetic foot ulcers. Wounds UK, 2(1), 25-31.

Kerraboot® vs Allevyn for treating diabetic foot ulcers. / Edmonds, Michael; Foster, Ali; Jemmott, Tim; Kerr, David; Malik, Rayaz; Knowles, Ann; Jude, Edward; Chadwick, Paul; Rahaman, Lufat; Murray, Neil.

In: Wounds UK, Vol. 2, No. 1, 03.2006, p. 25-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Edmonds, M, Foster, A, Jemmott, T, Kerr, D, Malik, R, Knowles, A, Jude, E, Chadwick, P, Rahaman, L & Murray, N 2006, 'Kerraboot® vs Allevyn for treating diabetic foot ulcers', Wounds UK, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 25-31.
Edmonds M, Foster A, Jemmott T, Kerr D, Malik R, Knowles A et al. Kerraboot® vs Allevyn for treating diabetic foot ulcers. Wounds UK. 2006 Mar;2(1):25-31.
Edmonds, Michael ; Foster, Ali ; Jemmott, Tim ; Kerr, David ; Malik, Rayaz ; Knowles, Ann ; Jude, Edward ; Chadwick, Paul ; Rahaman, Lufat ; Murray, Neil. / Kerraboot® vs Allevyn for treating diabetic foot ulcers. In: Wounds UK. 2006 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 25-31.
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