Kernel-based machines for abstract and easy modeling of automatic learning

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The modeling of system semantics (in several ICT domains) by means of pattern analysis or relational learning is a product of latest results in statistical learning theory. For example, the modeling of natural language semantics expressed by text, images, speech in information search (e.g. Google, Yahoo,..) or DNA sequence labeling in Bioinformatics represent distinguished cases of successful use of statistical machine learning. The reason of this success is due to the ability to overcome the concrete limitations of logic/rule-based approaches to semantic modeling: although, from a knowledge engineer perspective, rules are natural methods to encode system semantics, noise, ambiguity and errors affecting dynamic systems, prevent such approached from being effective, e.g. they are not flexible enough. In contrast, statistical relational learning, applied to representations of system states, i.e. training examples, can produce semantic models of system behavior based on a large number attributes. As the values of the latter are automatically learned, they reflect the flexibility of statistical settings and the overall model is robust to unexpected system condition changes. Unfortunately, while attribute weight and their relations with other attributes can be automatically learned from examples, their design for representing the target object (e.g. a system state) has to be manually carry out. This requires expertise, intuition and deep knowledge about the expected system behavior. A typical difficult task is for example the conversion of structures into attribute-value representations. Kernel Methods are powerful techniques designed within the statistical learning theory. They can be used in learning algorithms in place of attributes, thus simplifying object representation. More specifically, kernel functions can define structural and semantic similarities between objects (e.g. states) at abstract level, replacing the similarity defined in terms of attribute overlap. In this chapter, we provide the basic notions of machine learning along with latest theoretical results obtained in recent years. First, we show traditional and simple machine learning algorithms based on attribute-value representations and probability notions such as the Naive Bayes and the Decision Tree classifiers. Second, we introduce the PAC learning theory and the Perceptron algorithm to provide the readers with essential concepts of modern machine learning. Finally, we use the above background to illustrate a simplified theory of Support Vector Machines, which, along with the kernel methods, are the ultimate product of the statistical learning theory.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Pages458-503
Number of pages46
Volume6659 LNCS
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event11th International School on Formal Methods for the Design of Computer, Communication and Software Systems, SFM 2011 - Bertinoro, Italy
Duration: 13 Jun 201118 Jun 2011

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume6659 LNCS
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Other

Other11th International School on Formal Methods for the Design of Computer, Communication and Software Systems, SFM 2011
CountryItaly
CityBertinoro
Period13/6/1118/6/11

Fingerprint

Semantics
Attribute
kernel
Learning systems
Statistical Learning Theory
Modeling
Machine Learning
Kernel Methods
Learning algorithms
Learning Algorithm
PAC Learning
Object Representation
DNA sequences
Statistical Learning
Bioinformatics
Pattern Analysis
Semantic Similarity
Decision trees
Learning Theory
Structural Similarity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Moschitti, A. (2011). Kernel-based machines for abstract and easy modeling of automatic learning. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (Vol. 6659 LNCS, pp. 458-503). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 6659 LNCS). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-21455-4_14

Kernel-based machines for abstract and easy modeling of automatic learning. / Moschitti, Alessandro.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 6659 LNCS 2011. p. 458-503 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 6659 LNCS).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Moschitti, A 2011, Kernel-based machines for abstract and easy modeling of automatic learning. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). vol. 6659 LNCS, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 6659 LNCS, pp. 458-503, 11th International School on Formal Methods for the Design of Computer, Communication and Software Systems, SFM 2011, Bertinoro, Italy, 13/6/11. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-21455-4_14
Moschitti A. Kernel-based machines for abstract and easy modeling of automatic learning. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 6659 LNCS. 2011. p. 458-503. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-21455-4_14
Moschitti, Alessandro. / Kernel-based machines for abstract and easy modeling of automatic learning. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 6659 LNCS 2011. pp. 458-503 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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