Integration of bioinformatics tools at the National University of Singapore (NUS)

Prasanna Kolatkar, M. K. Sakharkar, T. C. Roderic, B. K. Kiong, L. Wong, T. W. Tan, S. Subbiah

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In the past decade 'Big Science' such as the Genome Project has generated an enormous amount of data in the life sciences. Concurrently, the synergy of this project with existing research has quickened the pace of biological discovery. But the major drawback that is beginning to be felt worldwide is the primitive level of organisation in the data accumulated. Without a proper framework or knowledge scaffold to hang and interconnect the various bits of data and information, the notional knowledge to-data ratio is declining rapidly. We are trying to serve a solution to this enigma by providing a World Wide Web (WWW) interface to Biosoftware and at the same time have come up with a database integration tool that can query heterogeneous, geographically scattered and disparate databases simultaneously. In this report we will talk about Bioinformatics in general with specific reference to Bioinformatics Centre (BIC) at the National University of Singapore.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Pages356-360
Number of pages5
Volume52
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 1998
Externally publishedYes
Event9th World Congress on Medical Informatics, MedInfo 1998 - Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Duration: 18 Aug 199822 Aug 1998

Other

Other9th World Congress on Medical Informatics, MedInfo 1998
CountryKorea, Republic of
CitySeoul
Period18/8/9822/8/98

Fingerprint

Singapore
Bioinformatics
Computational Biology
Databases
Biological Science Disciplines
Scaffolds
World Wide Web
Internet
Genes
Genome
Research

Keywords

  • Biocomputing
  • Bioinformatics
  • Database

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Kolatkar, P., Sakharkar, M. K., Roderic, T. C., Kiong, B. K., Wong, L., Tan, T. W., & Subbiah, S. (1998). Integration of bioinformatics tools at the National University of Singapore (NUS). In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics (Vol. 52, pp. 356-360) https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-896-0-356

Integration of bioinformatics tools at the National University of Singapore (NUS). / Kolatkar, Prasanna; Sakharkar, M. K.; Roderic, T. C.; Kiong, B. K.; Wong, L.; Tan, T. W.; Subbiah, S.

Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 52 1998. p. 356-360.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kolatkar, P, Sakharkar, MK, Roderic, TC, Kiong, BK, Wong, L, Tan, TW & Subbiah, S 1998, Integration of bioinformatics tools at the National University of Singapore (NUS). in Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. vol. 52, pp. 356-360, 9th World Congress on Medical Informatics, MedInfo 1998, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 18/8/98. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-896-0-356
Kolatkar P, Sakharkar MK, Roderic TC, Kiong BK, Wong L, Tan TW et al. Integration of bioinformatics tools at the National University of Singapore (NUS). In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 52. 1998. p. 356-360 https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-896-0-356
Kolatkar, Prasanna ; Sakharkar, M. K. ; Roderic, T. C. ; Kiong, B. K. ; Wong, L. ; Tan, T. W. ; Subbiah, S. / Integration of bioinformatics tools at the National University of Singapore (NUS). Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 52 1998. pp. 356-360
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