Integrating social media communications into the rapid assessment of sudden onset disasters

Sarah Vieweg, Carlos Castillo, Muhammad Imran

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research on automatic analysis of social media data during disasters has given insight into how to provide valuable and timely information to formal response agencies—and members of the public—in these safety-critical situations. For the most part, this work has followed a bottom-up approach in which data are analyzed first, and the target audience’s needs are addressed later. Here, we adopt a top-down approach in which the starting point are information needs. We focus on the aid agency tasked with coordinating humanitarian response within the United Nations: OCHA, the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. When disasters occur, OCHA must quickly make decisions based on the most complete picture of the situation they can obtain. They are responsible for organizing search and rescue operations, emergency food assistance, and similar tasks. Given that complete knowledge of any disaster event is not possible, they gather information from myriad available sources, including social media. In this paper, we examine the rapid assessment procedures used by OCHA, and explain how they executed these procedures during the 2013 Typhoon Yolanda. In addition, we interview a small sample of OCHA employees, focusing on their uses and views of social media data. In addition, we show how state-of-the-art social media processing methods can be used to produce information in a format that takes into account what large international humanitarian organizations require to meet their constantly evolving needs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages444-461
Number of pages18
Volume8851
ISBN (Print)9783319137339
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Event6th International Conference on Social Informatics, SocInfo 2014 - Barcelona, Spain
Duration: 11 Nov 201413 Nov 2014

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume8851
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Other

Other6th International Conference on Social Informatics, SocInfo 2014
CountrySpain
CityBarcelona
Period11/11/1413/11/14

Fingerprint

Social Media
Disaster
Disasters
Communication
Typhoon
Bottom-up
Emergency
Small Sample
Personnel
Safety
Processing
Target

Keywords

  • Crisis informatics
  • Humanitarian computing
  • Microblogging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Vieweg, S., Castillo, C., & Imran, M. (2014). Integrating social media communications into the rapid assessment of sudden onset disasters. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (Vol. 8851, pp. 444-461). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 8851). Springer Verlag.

Integrating social media communications into the rapid assessment of sudden onset disasters. / Vieweg, Sarah; Castillo, Carlos; Imran, Muhammad.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 8851 Springer Verlag, 2014. p. 444-461 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 8851).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Vieweg, S, Castillo, C & Imran, M 2014, Integrating social media communications into the rapid assessment of sudden onset disasters. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). vol. 8851, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 8851, Springer Verlag, pp. 444-461, 6th International Conference on Social Informatics, SocInfo 2014, Barcelona, Spain, 11/11/14.
Vieweg S, Castillo C, Imran M. Integrating social media communications into the rapid assessment of sudden onset disasters. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 8851. Springer Verlag. 2014. p. 444-461. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
Vieweg, Sarah ; Castillo, Carlos ; Imran, Muhammad. / Integrating social media communications into the rapid assessment of sudden onset disasters. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 8851 Springer Verlag, 2014. pp. 444-461 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
@inproceedings{19be4c56edf64b8190806b8ea3771494,
title = "Integrating social media communications into the rapid assessment of sudden onset disasters",
abstract = "Recent research on automatic analysis of social media data during disasters has given insight into how to provide valuable and timely information to formal response agencies—and members of the public—in these safety-critical situations. For the most part, this work has followed a bottom-up approach in which data are analyzed first, and the target audience’s needs are addressed later. Here, we adopt a top-down approach in which the starting point are information needs. We focus on the aid agency tasked with coordinating humanitarian response within the United Nations: OCHA, the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. When disasters occur, OCHA must quickly make decisions based on the most complete picture of the situation they can obtain. They are responsible for organizing search and rescue operations, emergency food assistance, and similar tasks. Given that complete knowledge of any disaster event is not possible, they gather information from myriad available sources, including social media. In this paper, we examine the rapid assessment procedures used by OCHA, and explain how they executed these procedures during the 2013 Typhoon Yolanda. In addition, we interview a small sample of OCHA employees, focusing on their uses and views of social media data. In addition, we show how state-of-the-art social media processing methods can be used to produce information in a format that takes into account what large international humanitarian organizations require to meet their constantly evolving needs.",
keywords = "Crisis informatics, Humanitarian computing, Microblogging",
author = "Sarah Vieweg and Carlos Castillo and Muhammad Imran",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
isbn = "9783319137339",
volume = "8851",
series = "Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
pages = "444--461",
booktitle = "Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Integrating social media communications into the rapid assessment of sudden onset disasters

AU - Vieweg, Sarah

AU - Castillo, Carlos

AU - Imran, Muhammad

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Recent research on automatic analysis of social media data during disasters has given insight into how to provide valuable and timely information to formal response agencies—and members of the public—in these safety-critical situations. For the most part, this work has followed a bottom-up approach in which data are analyzed first, and the target audience’s needs are addressed later. Here, we adopt a top-down approach in which the starting point are information needs. We focus on the aid agency tasked with coordinating humanitarian response within the United Nations: OCHA, the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. When disasters occur, OCHA must quickly make decisions based on the most complete picture of the situation they can obtain. They are responsible for organizing search and rescue operations, emergency food assistance, and similar tasks. Given that complete knowledge of any disaster event is not possible, they gather information from myriad available sources, including social media. In this paper, we examine the rapid assessment procedures used by OCHA, and explain how they executed these procedures during the 2013 Typhoon Yolanda. In addition, we interview a small sample of OCHA employees, focusing on their uses and views of social media data. In addition, we show how state-of-the-art social media processing methods can be used to produce information in a format that takes into account what large international humanitarian organizations require to meet their constantly evolving needs.

AB - Recent research on automatic analysis of social media data during disasters has given insight into how to provide valuable and timely information to formal response agencies—and members of the public—in these safety-critical situations. For the most part, this work has followed a bottom-up approach in which data are analyzed first, and the target audience’s needs are addressed later. Here, we adopt a top-down approach in which the starting point are information needs. We focus on the aid agency tasked with coordinating humanitarian response within the United Nations: OCHA, the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. When disasters occur, OCHA must quickly make decisions based on the most complete picture of the situation they can obtain. They are responsible for organizing search and rescue operations, emergency food assistance, and similar tasks. Given that complete knowledge of any disaster event is not possible, they gather information from myriad available sources, including social media. In this paper, we examine the rapid assessment procedures used by OCHA, and explain how they executed these procedures during the 2013 Typhoon Yolanda. In addition, we interview a small sample of OCHA employees, focusing on their uses and views of social media data. In addition, we show how state-of-the-art social media processing methods can be used to produce information in a format that takes into account what large international humanitarian organizations require to meet their constantly evolving needs.

KW - Crisis informatics

KW - Humanitarian computing

KW - Microblogging

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84914128953&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84914128953&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9783319137339

VL - 8851

T3 - Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)

SP - 444

EP - 461

BT - Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)

PB - Springer Verlag

ER -