Inkjet printing of functional lonogels for flexible and transparent conductive electrode materials

J. T. Delaney, A. R. Liberski, J. Perelaer, U. S. Schubert

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Printed electronics represent an emerging area of research that promises large markets due to the ability to bypass traditional expensive and inflexible silicon-based electronics to fabricate a variety of devices on flexible substrates using high-throughput printing approaches. One of the major targets in printed electronics is reducing the overall process temperature. In roll-2-roll manufacturing common polymer foils are used that often have a relative low glass transition temperature (Tg), usually below 150 °C. In order to produce conductive features on these polymer foils the often used approach of printing inorganic nanoparticles and subsequent sintering by heating cannot be used, since high temperatures are necessary, although selective sintering techniques like microwave or plasma exposure can be used. We present here a simple, practical approach to prepare ionic liquid gels that show conductivity in the semi-conductive region without the necessity of heating or sintering. Furthermore, these ionogel films are flexible and show optical transparency greater than 94% from near-UV to near-IR.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Conference on Digital Printing Technologies
Pages121-123
Number of pages3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event26th International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies, NIP26 and 6th International Conference on Digital Fabrication 2010, DF 2010 - Austin, TX, United States
Duration: 19 Sep 201023 Sep 2010

Other

Other26th International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies, NIP26 and 6th International Conference on Digital Fabrication 2010, DF 2010
CountryUnited States
CityAustin, TX
Period19/9/1023/9/10

Fingerprint

Printing
Electronic equipment
Sintering
Metal foil
Electrodes
Heating
Polymers
Ionic liquids
Transparency
Gels
Microwaves
Throughput
Nanoparticles
Plasmas
Silicon
Temperature
Substrates
Glass transition temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Media Technology
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Delaney, J. T., Liberski, A. R., Perelaer, J., & Schubert, U. S. (2010). Inkjet printing of functional lonogels for flexible and transparent conductive electrode materials. In International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies (pp. 121-123)

Inkjet printing of functional lonogels for flexible and transparent conductive electrode materials. / Delaney, J. T.; Liberski, A. R.; Perelaer, J.; Schubert, U. S.

International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies. 2010. p. 121-123.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Delaney, JT, Liberski, AR, Perelaer, J & Schubert, US 2010, Inkjet printing of functional lonogels for flexible and transparent conductive electrode materials. in International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies. pp. 121-123, 26th International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies, NIP26 and 6th International Conference on Digital Fabrication 2010, DF 2010, Austin, TX, United States, 19/9/10.
Delaney JT, Liberski AR, Perelaer J, Schubert US. Inkjet printing of functional lonogels for flexible and transparent conductive electrode materials. In International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies. 2010. p. 121-123
Delaney, J. T. ; Liberski, A. R. ; Perelaer, J. ; Schubert, U. S. / Inkjet printing of functional lonogels for flexible and transparent conductive electrode materials. International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies. 2010. pp. 121-123
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