Information credibility on Twitter

Carlos Castillo, Marcelo Mendoza, Barbara Poblete

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

775 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We analyze the information credibility of news propagated through Twitter, a popular microblogging service. Previous research has shown that most of the messages posted on Twitter are truthful, but the service is also used to spread misinformation and false rumors, often unintentionally. On this paper we focus on automatic methods for assessing the credibility of a given set of tweets. Specifically, we analyze microblog postings related to "trending" topics, and classify them as credible or not credible, based on features extracted from them. We use features from users' posting and re-posting ("re-tweeting") behavior, from the text of the posts, and from citations to external sources. We evaluate our methods using a significant number of human assessments about the credibility of items on a recent sample of Twitter postings. Our results shows that there are measurable differences in the way messages propagate, that can be used to classify them automatically as credible or not credible, with precision and recall in the range of 70% to 80%. Copyright is held by the International World Wide Web Conference Committee (IW3C2).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 20th International Conference Companion on World Wide Web, WWW 2011
Pages675-684
Number of pages10
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event20th International Conference Companion on World Wide Web, WWW 2011 - Hyderabad, India
Duration: 28 Mar 20111 Apr 2011

Other

Other20th International Conference Companion on World Wide Web, WWW 2011
CountryIndia
CityHyderabad
Period28/3/111/4/11

Fingerprint

World Wide Web

Keywords

  • Social media analytics
  • Social media credibility
  • Twitter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Information Systems

Cite this

Castillo, C., Mendoza, M., & Poblete, B. (2011). Information credibility on Twitter. In Proceedings of the 20th International Conference Companion on World Wide Web, WWW 2011 (pp. 675-684)

Information credibility on Twitter. / Castillo, Carlos; Mendoza, Marcelo; Poblete, Barbara.

Proceedings of the 20th International Conference Companion on World Wide Web, WWW 2011. 2011. p. 675-684.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Castillo, C, Mendoza, M & Poblete, B 2011, Information credibility on Twitter. in Proceedings of the 20th International Conference Companion on World Wide Web, WWW 2011. pp. 675-684, 20th International Conference Companion on World Wide Web, WWW 2011, Hyderabad, India, 28/3/11.
Castillo C, Mendoza M, Poblete B. Information credibility on Twitter. In Proceedings of the 20th International Conference Companion on World Wide Web, WWW 2011. 2011. p. 675-684
Castillo, Carlos ; Mendoza, Marcelo ; Poblete, Barbara. / Information credibility on Twitter. Proceedings of the 20th International Conference Companion on World Wide Web, WWW 2011. 2011. pp. 675-684
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