Influence of iron-bearing phyllosilicates on the dechlorination kinetics of 1,1,1-trichloroethane in Fe(II)/cement slurries

Bahngmi Jung, Bill Batchelor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the effect of iron-bearing phyllosilicates on dechlorination rates of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) in iron-based degradative solidification/stabilization (DS/S-Fe(II)). Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to evaluate dechlorination rates of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) in a mixture solution of Fe(II), cement and three different iron-bearing phyllosilicates (biotite, vermiculite, and montmorillonite). A first-order rate model was generally used to describe the dechlorination kinetics and the rate constants were dependent on soil mineral type (biotite, vermiculite, and montmorillonite), Fe(II) dose, and the mass ratio of cement to soil mineral. The pseudo-first-order rate constant for montmorillonite was lower than that for biotite and vermiculite by factors of 11-27 when the mass ratio of cement to phyllosilicates was fixed at one. The presence of biotite and vermiculite increase and the presence of montmorillonite decrease the degradation rate that would be observed in their absence. The effect of cement/mineral ratio on rate constants with three different soil minerals indicates that biotite was more reactive than the other two phyllosilicates. This may be due to high accessible natural Fe(II) content in biotite. Montmorillonite appears to inhibit dechlorination by either inactivating Fe(II) by ion exchange or by physically blocking active sites on cement hydration products.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1254-1261
Number of pages8
JournalChemosphere
Volume68
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bearings (structural)
Dechlorination
Bentonite
phyllosilicate
Slurries
dechlorination
Cements
cement
Iron
biotite
montmorillonite
iron
vermiculite
kinetics
Kinetics
Minerals
Rate constants
Soils
mineral
aliphatic hydrocarbon

Keywords

  • Degradative solidification/stabilization
  • Fe(II)
  • Iron-bearing phyllosilicates
  • Portland cement
  • Reductive dechlorination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Influence of iron-bearing phyllosilicates on the dechlorination kinetics of 1,1,1-trichloroethane in Fe(II)/cement slurries. / Jung, Bahngmi; Batchelor, Bill.

In: Chemosphere, Vol. 68, No. 7, 07.2007, p. 1254-1261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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