Impact of renal donation. Long-term clinical and biochemical follow-up of living donors in a single center

Ilene J. Miller, Manikkam Suthanthiran, Robert R. Riggio, John J. Williams, Robert A. Riehle, E. Darracott Vaughan, William T. Stubenbord, Janet Mouradian, Jhoong S. Cheigh, Kurt H. Stenzel

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Abstract

Forty-six renal donors who responded to a questionnaire and two additional donors with nephrotic syndrome and renal insufficiency were studied. The mean age was 46 ± 2.0 years (mean ±SE). Duration of follow-up was 6 ± 0.5 years. Serum creatinine levels increased from 1.0 ± 0.03 mg/dl before donation to 1.2 ± 0.04 mg/dl at follow-up. The incidence of proteinuria (more than 150 mg over 24 hours) was 39 percent. The serum creatinine level was 1.0 ± 0.08 mg/dl and 1.2 ± 0.06 mg/dl in the proteinuric and nonproteinuric groups, respectively. The incidence of hypertension was 31 percent with a serum creatinine level of 1.1 ± 0.11 mg/dl and 1.2 ± 0.07 mg/dl in the hypertensive and normotensive groups, respectively. One patient with nephrotic syndrome had proliferative glomerulonephritis. It is concluded that renal donation is associated with a minimal but statistically significant increment in serum creatinine levels. The incidence of mild hypertension and proteinuria is increased, but impact on renal function is minimal as assessed by serum creatinine determination.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)201-208
Number of pages8
JournalThe American Journal of Medicine
Volume79
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Living Donors
Creatinine
Kidney
Serum
Nephrotic Syndrome
Proteinuria
Incidence
Tissue Donors
Hypertension
Glomerulonephritis
Renal Insufficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Impact of renal donation. Long-term clinical and biochemical follow-up of living donors in a single center. / Miller, Ilene J.; Suthanthiran, Manikkam; Riggio, Robert R.; Williams, John J.; Riehle, Robert A.; Vaughan, E. Darracott; Stubenbord, William T.; Mouradian, Janet; Cheigh, Jhoong S.; Stenzel, Kurt H.

In: The American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 79, No. 2, 01.01.1985, p. 201-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, IJ, Suthanthiran, M, Riggio, RR, Williams, JJ, Riehle, RA, Vaughan, ED, Stubenbord, WT, Mouradian, J, Cheigh, JS & Stenzel, KH 1985, 'Impact of renal donation. Long-term clinical and biochemical follow-up of living donors in a single center', The American Journal of Medicine, vol. 79, no. 2, pp. 201-208. https://doi.org/10.1016/0002-9343(85)90010-5
Miller, Ilene J. ; Suthanthiran, Manikkam ; Riggio, Robert R. ; Williams, John J. ; Riehle, Robert A. ; Vaughan, E. Darracott ; Stubenbord, William T. ; Mouradian, Janet ; Cheigh, Jhoong S. ; Stenzel, Kurt H. / Impact of renal donation. Long-term clinical and biochemical follow-up of living donors in a single center. In: The American Journal of Medicine. 1985 ; Vol. 79, No. 2. pp. 201-208.
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