If you feel it now you will think it later: The interactive effects of mood over time on brand extension evaluations

Sela Sar, Brittany R.L. Duff, George Anghelcev

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While mood has been found to affect brand extension evaluations, the specific mechanisms by which it affects those evaluations remain largely untested. This study suggests that mood-induced differences in cognitive processing style (relational vs. item-specific elaboration) are possible explanations affecting brand extension evaluations. Results of two experiments showed that consumers in a positive (vs. negative) mood engaged in relational (vs. item-specific) elaboration and consequently evaluated brand extensions and brand extension fit more favorably than consumers in a negative mood. The effects were found immediately after exposure (Experiment 1) and after a one-week delay (Experiment 2). Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)561-583
Number of pages23
JournalPsychology and Marketing
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Mood
Evaluation
Brand extensions
Experiment
Elaboration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Marketing

Cite this

If you feel it now you will think it later : The interactive effects of mood over time on brand extension evaluations. / Sar, Sela; Duff, Brittany R.L.; Anghelcev, George.

In: Psychology and Marketing, Vol. 28, No. 6, 01.06.2011, p. 561-583.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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