How much can slow light increase the efficiency in thin-film planar solar cell devices

Olivier Deparis, Ounsi El Daif

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In periodic stacks of planar bilayers in which the high-index layers are made of an optically absorbing material, the phenomenon of slow light can be exploited in order to enhance absorption of the light in the high-index layers by suitably locating the red edge of the photonic band gap in the spectral region where the extinction coefficient is high. This concept is theoretically demonstrated here in the case of a Bragg resonator made of alternating layers of active (photovoltaic) high-index material and passive (transparent conductive oxide) low-index material. The transfer-matrix formalism is used to calculate the absorption spectrum of the Bragg resonator from which the maximum achievable photo-current is determined. In comparison with a reference slab of identical thickness of active material, we demonstrate that the photo-current can be enhanced provided that the layer thicknesses and the number of layers are suitably chosen. Highest enhancement values (factor of 2.5) are obtained for very thin layers of active material and a few layers only. Therefore, this concept is regarded as a promising way to increase the efficiency of realistic thin-film planar solar cell structures at reduced fabrication costs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIntegrated Photonics Research, Silicon and Nanophotonics, IPRSN 2012
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventIntegrated Photonics Research, Silicon and Nanophotonics, IPRSN 2012 - Colorado Springs, CO, United States
Duration: 17 Jun 201220 Jun 2012

Other

OtherIntegrated Photonics Research, Silicon and Nanophotonics, IPRSN 2012
CountryUnited States
CityColorado Springs, CO
Period17/6/1220/6/12

Fingerprint

solar cells
thin films
resonators
slabs
extinction
photonics
formalism
costs
absorption spectra
fabrication
oxides
augmentation
coefficients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Deparis, O., & Daif, O. E. (2012). How much can slow light increase the efficiency in thin-film planar solar cell devices. In Integrated Photonics Research, Silicon and Nanophotonics, IPRSN 2012

How much can slow light increase the efficiency in thin-film planar solar cell devices. / Deparis, Olivier; Daif, Ounsi El.

Integrated Photonics Research, Silicon and Nanophotonics, IPRSN 2012. 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Deparis, O & Daif, OE 2012, How much can slow light increase the efficiency in thin-film planar solar cell devices. in Integrated Photonics Research, Silicon and Nanophotonics, IPRSN 2012. Integrated Photonics Research, Silicon and Nanophotonics, IPRSN 2012, Colorado Springs, CO, United States, 17/6/12.
Deparis O, Daif OE. How much can slow light increase the efficiency in thin-film planar solar cell devices. In Integrated Photonics Research, Silicon and Nanophotonics, IPRSN 2012. 2012
Deparis, Olivier ; Daif, Ounsi El. / How much can slow light increase the efficiency in thin-film planar solar cell devices. Integrated Photonics Research, Silicon and Nanophotonics, IPRSN 2012. 2012.
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