Histocultures (tissue explants) in human retrovirology

Anush Arakelyan, Wendy Fitzgerald, Jean-Charles B. Grivel, Christophe Vanpouille, Leonid Margolis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Viral pathogenesis is studied predominantly in cultures of primary isolated cells or cell lines. Many retroviruses efficiently replicate only in activated cells. Therefore, in order to become efficient viral producers cells should be artificially activated, a procedure which significantly changes cell physiology. However, for many viral diseases, like HIV-1 and other retroviruses' diseases, critical pathogenic events occur in tissues. Therefore, cell isolation from their native microenvironment prevents single-cell cultures from faithfully reflecting important aspects of cell-cell and cell-pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture. Tissue explants (histocultures) that retain tissue cytoarchitecture and many aspects of cell-cell interactions more faithfully represent in vivo tissue features. Human histocultures constitute an adequate model for studying viral pathogenesis under controlled laboratory conditions. Protocols for various human histocultures as applied to study retroviral pathogenesis, in particular of HIV-1, have been refined by our laboratory and are described in the present publication. Histocultures of human tonsils and lymph nodes, as well as of recto-sigmoid and cervicovaginal tissues can be used to study viral transmission, pathogenesis and as a preclinical platform for antivirals evaluation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHuman Retroviruses: Methods and Protocols
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages233-248
Number of pages16
Volume1087
ISBN (Print)9781627036696
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume1087
ISSN (Print)10643745

Fingerprint

Retroviridae
Cell Communication
HIV-1
Cell Physiological Phenomena
Primary Cell Culture
Cell Separation
Palatine Tonsil
Sigmoid Colon
Virus Diseases
Antiviral Agents
Cell Culture Techniques
Lymph Nodes
Cell Line

Keywords

  • Explants
  • Flow cytometry
  • Histoculture
  • HIV
  • Human tissue
  • Pathogenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Arakelyan, A., Fitzgerald, W., Grivel, J-C. B., Vanpouille, C., & Margolis, L. (2014). Histocultures (tissue explants) in human retrovirology. In Human Retroviruses: Methods and Protocols (Vol. 1087, pp. 233-248). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1087). Humana Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-670-2_19

Histocultures (tissue explants) in human retrovirology. / Arakelyan, Anush; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles B.; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid.

Human Retroviruses: Methods and Protocols. Vol. 1087 Humana Press Inc., 2014. p. 233-248 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1087).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Arakelyan, A, Fitzgerald, W, Grivel, J-CB, Vanpouille, C & Margolis, L 2014, Histocultures (tissue explants) in human retrovirology. in Human Retroviruses: Methods and Protocols. vol. 1087, Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 1087, Humana Press Inc., pp. 233-248. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-670-2_19
Arakelyan A, Fitzgerald W, Grivel J-CB, Vanpouille C, Margolis L. Histocultures (tissue explants) in human retrovirology. In Human Retroviruses: Methods and Protocols. Vol. 1087. Humana Press Inc. 2014. p. 233-248. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-670-2_19
Arakelyan, Anush ; Fitzgerald, Wendy ; Grivel, Jean-Charles B. ; Vanpouille, Christophe ; Margolis, Leonid. / Histocultures (tissue explants) in human retrovirology. Human Retroviruses: Methods and Protocols. Vol. 1087 Humana Press Inc., 2014. pp. 233-248 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
@inbook{f5306d9080e24423b6e798106615b1e4,
title = "Histocultures (tissue explants) in human retrovirology",
abstract = "Viral pathogenesis is studied predominantly in cultures of primary isolated cells or cell lines. Many retroviruses efficiently replicate only in activated cells. Therefore, in order to become efficient viral producers cells should be artificially activated, a procedure which significantly changes cell physiology. However, for many viral diseases, like HIV-1 and other retroviruses' diseases, critical pathogenic events occur in tissues. Therefore, cell isolation from their native microenvironment prevents single-cell cultures from faithfully reflecting important aspects of cell-cell and cell-pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture. Tissue explants (histocultures) that retain tissue cytoarchitecture and many aspects of cell-cell interactions more faithfully represent in vivo tissue features. Human histocultures constitute an adequate model for studying viral pathogenesis under controlled laboratory conditions. Protocols for various human histocultures as applied to study retroviral pathogenesis, in particular of HIV-1, have been refined by our laboratory and are described in the present publication. Histocultures of human tonsils and lymph nodes, as well as of recto-sigmoid and cervicovaginal tissues can be used to study viral transmission, pathogenesis and as a preclinical platform for antivirals evaluation.",
keywords = "Explants, Flow cytometry, Histoculture, HIV, Human tissue, Pathogenesis",
author = "Anush Arakelyan and Wendy Fitzgerald and Grivel, {Jean-Charles B.} and Christophe Vanpouille and Leonid Margolis",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1007/978-1-62703-670-2_19",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781627036696",
volume = "1087",
series = "Methods in Molecular Biology",
publisher = "Humana Press Inc.",
pages = "233--248",
booktitle = "Human Retroviruses: Methods and Protocols",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Histocultures (tissue explants) in human retrovirology

AU - Arakelyan, Anush

AU - Fitzgerald, Wendy

AU - Grivel, Jean-Charles B.

AU - Vanpouille, Christophe

AU - Margolis, Leonid

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Viral pathogenesis is studied predominantly in cultures of primary isolated cells or cell lines. Many retroviruses efficiently replicate only in activated cells. Therefore, in order to become efficient viral producers cells should be artificially activated, a procedure which significantly changes cell physiology. However, for many viral diseases, like HIV-1 and other retroviruses' diseases, critical pathogenic events occur in tissues. Therefore, cell isolation from their native microenvironment prevents single-cell cultures from faithfully reflecting important aspects of cell-cell and cell-pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture. Tissue explants (histocultures) that retain tissue cytoarchitecture and many aspects of cell-cell interactions more faithfully represent in vivo tissue features. Human histocultures constitute an adequate model for studying viral pathogenesis under controlled laboratory conditions. Protocols for various human histocultures as applied to study retroviral pathogenesis, in particular of HIV-1, have been refined by our laboratory and are described in the present publication. Histocultures of human tonsils and lymph nodes, as well as of recto-sigmoid and cervicovaginal tissues can be used to study viral transmission, pathogenesis and as a preclinical platform for antivirals evaluation.

AB - Viral pathogenesis is studied predominantly in cultures of primary isolated cells or cell lines. Many retroviruses efficiently replicate only in activated cells. Therefore, in order to become efficient viral producers cells should be artificially activated, a procedure which significantly changes cell physiology. However, for many viral diseases, like HIV-1 and other retroviruses' diseases, critical pathogenic events occur in tissues. Therefore, cell isolation from their native microenvironment prevents single-cell cultures from faithfully reflecting important aspects of cell-cell and cell-pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture. Tissue explants (histocultures) that retain tissue cytoarchitecture and many aspects of cell-cell interactions more faithfully represent in vivo tissue features. Human histocultures constitute an adequate model for studying viral pathogenesis under controlled laboratory conditions. Protocols for various human histocultures as applied to study retroviral pathogenesis, in particular of HIV-1, have been refined by our laboratory and are described in the present publication. Histocultures of human tonsils and lymph nodes, as well as of recto-sigmoid and cervicovaginal tissues can be used to study viral transmission, pathogenesis and as a preclinical platform for antivirals evaluation.

KW - Explants

KW - Flow cytometry

KW - Histoculture

KW - HIV

KW - Human tissue

KW - Pathogenesis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84934439872&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84934439872&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-1-62703-670-2_19

DO - 10.1007/978-1-62703-670-2_19

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781627036696

VL - 1087

T3 - Methods in Molecular Biology

SP - 233

EP - 248

BT - Human Retroviruses: Methods and Protocols

PB - Humana Press Inc.

ER -