High-Density Lipoprotein Components and Functionality in Cancer

State-of-the-Art

Shiva Ganjali, Biagio Ricciuti, Matteo Pirro, Alexandra E. Butler, Stephen Atkin, Maciej Banach, Amirhossein Sahebkar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in western countries, and thus represents a major global public health issue. Whilst it is well-recognized that diet, obesity, and smoking are risk factors for cancer, the role of low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in cancer is less well appreciated. Conflicting evidence suggests that serum HDL-C levels may be either positively or negatively associated with cancer incidence and mortality. Such disparate associations are supported in part by the multitude of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) functions that can all have an impact on cancer cell biology. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the crosstalk between HDLs and cancer, focusing on the molecular mechanisms underlying this association.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTrends in Endocrinology and Metabolism
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

HDL Lipoproteins
Neoplasms
HDL Cholesterol
Second Primary Neoplasms
Cell Biology
Cause of Death
Public Health
Obesity
Smoking
Diet
Mortality
Incidence
Serum

Keywords

  • ABC
  • cancer
  • HDL
  • lipoprotein
  • reverse cholesterol transport
  • SR-BI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

High-Density Lipoprotein Components and Functionality in Cancer : State-of-the-Art. / Ganjali, Shiva; Ricciuti, Biagio; Pirro, Matteo; Butler, Alexandra E.; Atkin, Stephen; Banach, Maciej; Sahebkar, Amirhossein.

In: Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ganjali, Shiva ; Ricciuti, Biagio ; Pirro, Matteo ; Butler, Alexandra E. ; Atkin, Stephen ; Banach, Maciej ; Sahebkar, Amirhossein. / High-Density Lipoprotein Components and Functionality in Cancer : State-of-the-Art. In: Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2018.
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