GOP primary season on Twitter

"Popular" political sentiment in social media

Yelena Mejova, Padmini Srinivasan, Bob Boynton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As mainstream news media and political campaigns start to pay attention to the political discourse online, a systematic analysis of political speech in social media becomes more critical. What exactly do people say on these sites, and how useful is this data in estimating political popularity? In this study we examine Twitter discussions surrounding seven US Republican politicians who were running for the US Presidential nomination in 2011. We show this largely negative rhetoric to be laced with sarcasm and humor and dominated by a small portion of users. Furthermore, we show that using out-of-the-box classification tools results in a poor performance, and instead develop a highly optimized multi-stage approach designed for general-purpose political sentiment classification. Finally, we compare the change in sentiment detected in our dataset before and after 19 Republican debates, concluding that, at least in this case, the Twitter political chatter is not indicative of national political polls.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWSDM 2013 - Proceedings of the 6th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining
Pages517-525
Number of pages9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Feb 2013
Externally publishedYes
Event6th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, WSDM 2013 - Rome, Italy
Duration: 4 Feb 20138 Feb 2013

Other

Other6th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, WSDM 2013
CountryItaly
CityRome
Period4/2/138/2/13

Keywords

  • political discourse
  • sentiment analysis
  • social media

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Mejova, Y., Srinivasan, P., & Boynton, B. (2013). GOP primary season on Twitter: "Popular" political sentiment in social media. In WSDM 2013 - Proceedings of the 6th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining (pp. 517-525) https://doi.org/10.1145/2433396.2433463

GOP primary season on Twitter : "Popular" political sentiment in social media. / Mejova, Yelena; Srinivasan, Padmini; Boynton, Bob.

WSDM 2013 - Proceedings of the 6th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining. 2013. p. 517-525.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mejova, Y, Srinivasan, P & Boynton, B 2013, GOP primary season on Twitter: "Popular" political sentiment in social media. in WSDM 2013 - Proceedings of the 6th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining. pp. 517-525, 6th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, WSDM 2013, Rome, Italy, 4/2/13. https://doi.org/10.1145/2433396.2433463
Mejova Y, Srinivasan P, Boynton B. GOP primary season on Twitter: "Popular" political sentiment in social media. In WSDM 2013 - Proceedings of the 6th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining. 2013. p. 517-525 https://doi.org/10.1145/2433396.2433463
Mejova, Yelena ; Srinivasan, Padmini ; Boynton, Bob. / GOP primary season on Twitter : "Popular" political sentiment in social media. WSDM 2013 - Proceedings of the 6th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining. 2013. pp. 517-525
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