Glycine-nitrate combustion synthesis of oxide ceramic powders

L. A. Chick, L. R. Pederson, G. D. Maupin, J. L. Bates, L. E. Thomas, G. J. Exarhos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1039 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A new combustion synthesis method, the glycine-nitrate process, has been used to prepare oxide ceramic powders, including substituted chromite and manganite powders of high quality. A precursor was prepared by combining glycine with metal nitrates in their appropriate stoichiometric ratios in an aqueous solution. The precursor was heated to evaporate excess water, yielding a viscous liquid. Further heating to about 180°C caused the precursor liquid to autoignite. Combustion was rapid and self-sustaining, with flame temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1450°C. The chromite product was compositionally homogeneous with a specific surface area of 32 m2/g, while the manganite product was composed of two distinct phases with a 23 m2/g surface area after calcination. When compared to similar compositions made using the amorphous citrate process, glycine-nitrate-produced powders had greater compositional uniformity, lower residual carbon levels and smaller particle sizes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-12
Number of pages7
JournalMaterials Letters
Volume10
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

combustion synthesis
Combustion synthesis
glycine
Nitrates
Powders
Glycine
Oxides
nitrates
Amino acids
Chromite
chromites
ceramics
oxides
flame temperature
sustaining
Liquids
citrates
products
liquids
Citric Acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Chick, L. A., Pederson, L. R., Maupin, G. D., Bates, J. L., Thomas, L. E., & Exarhos, G. J. (1990). Glycine-nitrate combustion synthesis of oxide ceramic powders. Materials Letters, 10(1-2), 6-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/0167-577X(90)90003-5

Glycine-nitrate combustion synthesis of oxide ceramic powders. / Chick, L. A.; Pederson, L. R.; Maupin, G. D.; Bates, J. L.; Thomas, L. E.; Exarhos, G. J.

In: Materials Letters, Vol. 10, No. 1-2, 1990, p. 6-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chick, LA, Pederson, LR, Maupin, GD, Bates, JL, Thomas, LE & Exarhos, GJ 1990, 'Glycine-nitrate combustion synthesis of oxide ceramic powders', Materials Letters, vol. 10, no. 1-2, pp. 6-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/0167-577X(90)90003-5
Chick LA, Pederson LR, Maupin GD, Bates JL, Thomas LE, Exarhos GJ. Glycine-nitrate combustion synthesis of oxide ceramic powders. Materials Letters. 1990;10(1-2):6-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/0167-577X(90)90003-5
Chick, L. A. ; Pederson, L. R. ; Maupin, G. D. ; Bates, J. L. ; Thomas, L. E. ; Exarhos, G. J. / Glycine-nitrate combustion synthesis of oxide ceramic powders. In: Materials Letters. 1990 ; Vol. 10, No. 1-2. pp. 6-12.
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