Glycation in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease

Hugo Vicente Miranda, Omar Ali El-Agnaf, Tiago Fleming Outeiro

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glycation is a spontaneous age-dependent posttranslational modification that can impact the structure and function of several proteins. Interestingly, glycation can be detected at the periphery of Lewy bodies in the brain in Parkinson's disease. Moreover, α-synuclein can be glycated, at least under experimental conditions. In Alzheimer's disease, glycation of amyloid β peptide exacerbates its toxicity and contributes to neurodegeneration. Recent studies establish diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying this connection remain unclear. We hypothesize that hyperglycemia might play an important role in the development of these disorders, possibly by also inducing protein glycation and thereby dysfunction, aggregation, and deposition. Here, we explore protein glycation as a common player in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and propose it may constitute a novel target for the development of strategies for neuroprotective therapeutic interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)782-790
Number of pages9
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2016

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Glycation
  • Neurodegenerative diseases
  • Parkinson's disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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