Glucose Metabolism in Cancer and Ischemia: Possible Therapeutic Consequences of the Warburg Effect

Spela Salamon, Eva Podbregar, Peter Kubatka, Dietrich Busselberg, Martin Caprnda, Radka Opatrilova, Vanda Valentova, Mariusz Adamek, Peter Kruzliak, Matej Podbregar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Warburg effect states that the main source of energy for cancer cells is not aerobic respiration, but glycolysis—even in normoxia. The shift from one to the other is governed by mutually counteracting enzymes: pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK). Anaerobic metabolism of cancer cells promotes cell proliferation, local tissue immunosuppression, resistance to hypoxic conditions, and metastatic processes. By switching glucose back to oxidative metabolism, these effects might be reversed. This can be achieved using PDK inhibitors, such as dichloroacetate. Patients suffering from ischemic conditions might benefit from this effect. On the other hand, the β-blockers (adrenergic β-antagonists) often used in these patients appear to improve cancer-specific survival, and nonselective β-blockers have been shown to promote glucose oxidation. Might there be a link?

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-183
Number of pages7
JournalNutrition and Cancer
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Feb 2017

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Oncology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Salamon, S., Podbregar, E., Kubatka, P., Busselberg, D., Caprnda, M., Opatrilova, R., Valentova, V., Adamek, M., Kruzliak, P., & Podbregar, M. (2017). Glucose Metabolism in Cancer and Ischemia: Possible Therapeutic Consequences of the Warburg Effect. Nutrition and Cancer, 69(2), 177-183. https://doi.org/10.1080/01635581.2017.1263751