Get Back! You don't know me like that

The social mediation of fact checking interventions in twitter conversations

Aniko Hannak, Drew Margolin, Brian Keegan, Ingmar Weber

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prevalence of misinformation within social media and online communities can undermine public security and distract attention from important issues. Fact-checking interventions, in which users cite fact-checking websites such as Snopes.com and FactCheck.org, are a strategy users can employ to refute false claims made by their peers. While laboratory research suggests such interventions are not effective in persuading people to abandon false ideas, little work considers how such interventions are actually deployed in real-world conversations. Using approximately 1,600 interventions observed on Twitter between 2012 and 2013, we examine the contexts and consequences of fact-checking interventions.We focus in particular on the social relationship between the individual who issues the fact-check and the individual whose facts are challenged. Our results indicate that though fact-checking interventions are most commonly issued by strangers, they are more likely to draw user attention and responses when they come from friends. Finally, we discuss implications for designing more effective interventions against misinformation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 8th International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media, ICWSM 2014
PublisherThe AAAI Press
Pages187-196
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9781577356578
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Event8th International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media, ICWSM 2014 - Ann Arbor, United States
Duration: 1 Jun 20144 Jun 2014

Other

Other8th International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media, ICWSM 2014
CountryUnited States
CityAnn Arbor
Period1/6/144/6/14

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Research laboratories
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Hannak, A., Margolin, D., Keegan, B., & Weber, I. (2014). Get Back! You don't know me like that: The social mediation of fact checking interventions in twitter conversations. In Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media, ICWSM 2014 (pp. 187-196). The AAAI Press.

Get Back! You don't know me like that : The social mediation of fact checking interventions in twitter conversations. / Hannak, Aniko; Margolin, Drew; Keegan, Brian; Weber, Ingmar.

Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media, ICWSM 2014. The AAAI Press, 2014. p. 187-196.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hannak, A, Margolin, D, Keegan, B & Weber, I 2014, Get Back! You don't know me like that: The social mediation of fact checking interventions in twitter conversations. in Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media, ICWSM 2014. The AAAI Press, pp. 187-196, 8th International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media, ICWSM 2014, Ann Arbor, United States, 1/6/14.
Hannak A, Margolin D, Keegan B, Weber I. Get Back! You don't know me like that: The social mediation of fact checking interventions in twitter conversations. In Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media, ICWSM 2014. The AAAI Press. 2014. p. 187-196
Hannak, Aniko ; Margolin, Drew ; Keegan, Brian ; Weber, Ingmar. / Get Back! You don't know me like that : The social mediation of fact checking interventions in twitter conversations. Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media, ICWSM 2014. The AAAI Press, 2014. pp. 187-196
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