Functional status and emotional well-being, dietary intake, and physical activity of severely obese subjects

Maria Matthews Richards, Ted D. Adams, Steven Hunt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Analyze functional status and emotional well-being, energy and nutrient intake, and physical activity in sibling pairs raised together in the same family. Design: One sibling classified as severely obese (body mass index≥35) and the other sibling as normal weight (body mass index≤27). Subjects: From January 1994 through December 1996 at the Cardiovascular Genetics Research Clinic of the University of Utah School of Medicine, 145 sibling pairs (n=290) were selected from a population-based, family history database or a hospital-based, very-low-energy weight-loss program. Statistical analysis performed: Repeated-measures analysis of variance tested for differences between severely obese and normal-weight siblings. Results: All functional status and emotional well-being scores (poorer perceived health) were significantly lower in severely obese siblings compared with normal-weight siblings. The severely obese siblings had a higher percentage dietary fat intake (3% higher) and total energy intake (more than 350 kcal higher), and lower weight-adjusted total energy intake (almost 10 kcal/kg lower) and activity energy expenditure (3.5 kcal/kg lower), compared with normal-weight siblings. Thus, environmental influences such as energy and nutrient intake and physical activity are highly related to severe obesity. Applications: Previously shared environment of severely obese and normal-weight siblings raises questions about whether strong environmental influences or genetic predisposition account for the differences in sibling weight. When counseling individuals or families with a history of severe obesity, dietetics practitioners should be familiar with the potential for strong genetic factors and related environmental influences. In addition, dietitians should be prepared to offer a flexible approach to physical exercise as well as provide additional behavioral support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-75
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume100
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

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functional status
physical activity
Siblings
food intake
Exercise
Energy Intake
Weights and Measures
energy intake
Morbid Obesity
nutrient intake
obesity
Weight Reduction Programs
Ideal Body Weight
Food
Genetic Research
Dietetics
Nutritionists
counseling
Dietary Fats
dietitians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine(all)

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Functional status and emotional well-being, dietary intake, and physical activity of severely obese subjects. / Matthews Richards, Maria; Adams, Ted D.; Hunt, Steven.

In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 100, No. 1, 2000, p. 67-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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