From slacktivism to activism: Participatory culture in the age of social media

Dana Rotman, Jenny Preece, Sarah Vieweg, Shneiderman Ben, Sarita Yardi, Peter Pirolli, Ed H. Chi, Tom Glaisyer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social networking sites (e.g. Facebook), microblogging services (e.g. Twitter), and content-sharing sites (e.g. YouTube and Flickr) have introduced the opportunity for wide-scale, online social participation. Visibility of national and international priorities such as public health, political unrest, disaster relief, and climate change has increased, yet we know little about the benefits - and possible costs - of engaging in social activism via social media. These powerful social issues introduce a need for scientific research into technology mediated social participation. What are the actual, tangible benefits of "greening" Twitter profile pictures in support of the Iranian elections? Does cartooning a Facebook profile picture really raise awareness of child abuse? Are there unintended negative effects through low-risk, low-cost technology-mediated participation? And, is there a difference - in both outcome and engagement level - between different types of online social activism? This SIG will investigate technology mediated social participation through a critical lens, discussing both the potential positive and negative outcomes of such participation. Approaches to designing for increased participation, evaluating effects of participation, and next steps in scientific research directions will be discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
Pages819-822
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event29th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2011 - Vancouver, BC, Canada
Duration: 7 May 201112 May 2011

Other

Other29th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2011
CountryCanada
CityVancouver, BC
Period7/5/1112/5/11

Fingerprint

Public health
Visibility
Climate change
Disasters
Costs
Lenses

Keywords

  • Activism
  • Change
  • Design
  • Participation
  • Slacktivism
  • Social media

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software

Cite this

Rotman, D., Preece, J., Vieweg, S., Ben, S., Yardi, S., Pirolli, P., ... Glaisyer, T. (2011). From slacktivism to activism: Participatory culture in the age of social media. In Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings (pp. 819-822) https://doi.org/10.1145/1979742.1979543

From slacktivism to activism : Participatory culture in the age of social media. / Rotman, Dana; Preece, Jenny; Vieweg, Sarah; Ben, Shneiderman; Yardi, Sarita; Pirolli, Peter; Chi, Ed H.; Glaisyer, Tom.

Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. 2011. p. 819-822.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Rotman, D, Preece, J, Vieweg, S, Ben, S, Yardi, S, Pirolli, P, Chi, EH & Glaisyer, T 2011, From slacktivism to activism: Participatory culture in the age of social media. in Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. pp. 819-822, 29th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2011, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 7/5/11. https://doi.org/10.1145/1979742.1979543
Rotman D, Preece J, Vieweg S, Ben S, Yardi S, Pirolli P et al. From slacktivism to activism: Participatory culture in the age of social media. In Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. 2011. p. 819-822 https://doi.org/10.1145/1979742.1979543
Rotman, Dana ; Preece, Jenny ; Vieweg, Sarah ; Ben, Shneiderman ; Yardi, Sarita ; Pirolli, Peter ; Chi, Ed H. ; Glaisyer, Tom. / From slacktivism to activism : Participatory culture in the age of social media. Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. 2011. pp. 819-822
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