Formation of vascularized meniscal tissue by combining gene therapy with tissue engineering

Chisa Hidaka, Clemente Ibarra, Jo A. Hannafin, Peter A. Torzilli, Mannix Quitoriano, Shih Shi Jen, Russell F. Warren, Ronald Crystal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ingrowth of host blood vessels into engineered tissues has potential benefits for successful transplantation of engineered tissues as well as healing of surrounding host tissues. In particular, the use of a vascularized bioengineered tissue could be beneficial for treating injuries to the meniscus, a structure in the knee where the lack of a vascular supply is associated with an inadequate healing response. In this study, gene transfer using an adenovirus vector encoding the hepatocyte growth factor gene (AdHGF) was used to induce blood vessel formation in tissue-engineered meniscus. Bovine meniscal cells were treated with AdHGF, a vector encoding a marker gene E. coli β-galactosidase (Adβgal), or no virus. Cells were seeded onto poly-glycolic acid felt scaffolds and then transplanted into the subcutaneous pouch of athymic nude mice for 8 weeks. Expression of the marker gene and HGF was detectable for several weeks after gene transfer. Ink injection studies showed that AdHGF treated meniscal cells formed tissue which contained fourfold more blood vessels at 2 weeks (p < 0.02) and 2.5-fold more blood vessels at 8 weeks (p < 0.001) posttransplantation than controls. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to engineer a blood supply in the bioengineered meniscal tissue.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-105
Number of pages13
JournalTissue Engineering
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gene therapy
Tissue engineering
Tissue
Blood vessels
Gene transfer
Genes
Viruses
Ink
Scaffolds
Escherichia coli
Blood
Engineers
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Formation of vascularized meniscal tissue by combining gene therapy with tissue engineering. / Hidaka, Chisa; Ibarra, Clemente; Hannafin, Jo A.; Torzilli, Peter A.; Quitoriano, Mannix; Jen, Shih Shi; Warren, Russell F.; Crystal, Ronald.

In: Tissue Engineering, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.01.2002, p. 93-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hidaka, C, Ibarra, C, Hannafin, JA, Torzilli, PA, Quitoriano, M, Jen, SS, Warren, RF & Crystal, R 2002, 'Formation of vascularized meniscal tissue by combining gene therapy with tissue engineering', Tissue Engineering, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 93-105. https://doi.org/10.1089/107632702753503090
Hidaka C, Ibarra C, Hannafin JA, Torzilli PA, Quitoriano M, Jen SS et al. Formation of vascularized meniscal tissue by combining gene therapy with tissue engineering. Tissue Engineering. 2002 Jan 1;8(1):93-105. https://doi.org/10.1089/107632702753503090
Hidaka, Chisa ; Ibarra, Clemente ; Hannafin, Jo A. ; Torzilli, Peter A. ; Quitoriano, Mannix ; Jen, Shih Shi ; Warren, Russell F. ; Crystal, Ronald. / Formation of vascularized meniscal tissue by combining gene therapy with tissue engineering. In: Tissue Engineering. 2002 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 93-105.
@article{486140a02c7049a58fa64eca84c2898f,
title = "Formation of vascularized meniscal tissue by combining gene therapy with tissue engineering",
abstract = "Ingrowth of host blood vessels into engineered tissues has potential benefits for successful transplantation of engineered tissues as well as healing of surrounding host tissues. In particular, the use of a vascularized bioengineered tissue could be beneficial for treating injuries to the meniscus, a structure in the knee where the lack of a vascular supply is associated with an inadequate healing response. In this study, gene transfer using an adenovirus vector encoding the hepatocyte growth factor gene (AdHGF) was used to induce blood vessel formation in tissue-engineered meniscus. Bovine meniscal cells were treated with AdHGF, a vector encoding a marker gene E. coli β-galactosidase (Adβgal), or no virus. Cells were seeded onto poly-glycolic acid felt scaffolds and then transplanted into the subcutaneous pouch of athymic nude mice for 8 weeks. Expression of the marker gene and HGF was detectable for several weeks after gene transfer. Ink injection studies showed that AdHGF treated meniscal cells formed tissue which contained fourfold more blood vessels at 2 weeks (p < 0.02) and 2.5-fold more blood vessels at 8 weeks (p < 0.001) posttransplantation than controls. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to engineer a blood supply in the bioengineered meniscal tissue.",
author = "Chisa Hidaka and Clemente Ibarra and Hannafin, {Jo A.} and Torzilli, {Peter A.} and Mannix Quitoriano and Jen, {Shih Shi} and Warren, {Russell F.} and Ronald Crystal",
year = "2002",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/107632702753503090",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "93--105",
journal = "Tissue Engineering",
issn = "1076-3279",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Formation of vascularized meniscal tissue by combining gene therapy with tissue engineering

AU - Hidaka, Chisa

AU - Ibarra, Clemente

AU - Hannafin, Jo A.

AU - Torzilli, Peter A.

AU - Quitoriano, Mannix

AU - Jen, Shih Shi

AU - Warren, Russell F.

AU - Crystal, Ronald

PY - 2002/1/1

Y1 - 2002/1/1

N2 - Ingrowth of host blood vessels into engineered tissues has potential benefits for successful transplantation of engineered tissues as well as healing of surrounding host tissues. In particular, the use of a vascularized bioengineered tissue could be beneficial for treating injuries to the meniscus, a structure in the knee where the lack of a vascular supply is associated with an inadequate healing response. In this study, gene transfer using an adenovirus vector encoding the hepatocyte growth factor gene (AdHGF) was used to induce blood vessel formation in tissue-engineered meniscus. Bovine meniscal cells were treated with AdHGF, a vector encoding a marker gene E. coli β-galactosidase (Adβgal), or no virus. Cells were seeded onto poly-glycolic acid felt scaffolds and then transplanted into the subcutaneous pouch of athymic nude mice for 8 weeks. Expression of the marker gene and HGF was detectable for several weeks after gene transfer. Ink injection studies showed that AdHGF treated meniscal cells formed tissue which contained fourfold more blood vessels at 2 weeks (p < 0.02) and 2.5-fold more blood vessels at 8 weeks (p < 0.001) posttransplantation than controls. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to engineer a blood supply in the bioengineered meniscal tissue.

AB - Ingrowth of host blood vessels into engineered tissues has potential benefits for successful transplantation of engineered tissues as well as healing of surrounding host tissues. In particular, the use of a vascularized bioengineered tissue could be beneficial for treating injuries to the meniscus, a structure in the knee where the lack of a vascular supply is associated with an inadequate healing response. In this study, gene transfer using an adenovirus vector encoding the hepatocyte growth factor gene (AdHGF) was used to induce blood vessel formation in tissue-engineered meniscus. Bovine meniscal cells were treated with AdHGF, a vector encoding a marker gene E. coli β-galactosidase (Adβgal), or no virus. Cells were seeded onto poly-glycolic acid felt scaffolds and then transplanted into the subcutaneous pouch of athymic nude mice for 8 weeks. Expression of the marker gene and HGF was detectable for several weeks after gene transfer. Ink injection studies showed that AdHGF treated meniscal cells formed tissue which contained fourfold more blood vessels at 2 weeks (p < 0.02) and 2.5-fold more blood vessels at 8 weeks (p < 0.001) posttransplantation than controls. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to engineer a blood supply in the bioengineered meniscal tissue.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036189712&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036189712&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/107632702753503090

DO - 10.1089/107632702753503090

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 93

EP - 105

JO - Tissue Engineering

JF - Tissue Engineering

SN - 1076-3279

IS - 1

ER -