Formation of epitaxial oxide nanodots on oxide substrate

Cu2O on SrTiO3(1 0 0)

I. Lyubinetsky, A. S. Lea, S. Thevuthasan, D. R. Baer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis during the oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy, combined with atomic force microscopy and scanning Auger microscopy have been used to evaluate the mechanism of single-phase Cu2O nanodot formation on the SrTiO3(1 0 0) surface. Formation of pure crystalline Cu2O nanodots occurs rather in a narrow growth parameter window, outside which a coexistence of the multiple phases has been observed. Cuprous oxide nanodots on the SrTiO3(1 0 0) substrate follow a growth mechanism which differs significantly from the growth modes observed for the majority of semiconductor quantum dots. Growth starts without wetting layer formation with appearance of well-ordered truncated square-based nanodots at submonolayer coverages. At the initial stages of growth, the nanodot size is only weakly changes with coverage and exponentially scales with temperature. After reaching a critical, temperature dependent dot density (∼1013 cm-2 for 760 K growth temperature), growth of mid-sized nanoclusters starts through coalescence, which is eventually followed by large dome-shaped cluster formation at higher coverages. The coexistence of the different types of the clusters at high coverages results in a multimodal distribution of sizes and shapes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)120-128
Number of pages9
JournalSurface Science
Volume589
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Oxides
oxides
Substrates
Nanoclusters
Domes
Growth temperature
Laser modes
Coalescence
Molecular beam epitaxy
oxygen plasma
Semiconductor quantum dots
domes
Wetting
strontium titanium oxide
nanoclusters
Atomic force microscopy
Microscopic examination
coalescing
X ray photoelectron spectroscopy
wetting

Keywords

  • Atomic force microscopy
  • Clusters
  • Copper oxides
  • Molecular beam epitaxy
  • Self-assembly
  • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces

Cite this

Lyubinetsky, I., Lea, A. S., Thevuthasan, S., & Baer, D. R. (2005). Formation of epitaxial oxide nanodots on oxide substrate: Cu2O on SrTiO3(1 0 0). Surface Science, 589(1-3), 120-128. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.susc.2005.05.062

Formation of epitaxial oxide nanodots on oxide substrate : Cu2O on SrTiO3(1 0 0). / Lyubinetsky, I.; Lea, A. S.; Thevuthasan, S.; Baer, D. R.

In: Surface Science, Vol. 589, No. 1-3, 01.09.2005, p. 120-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lyubinetsky, I, Lea, AS, Thevuthasan, S & Baer, DR 2005, 'Formation of epitaxial oxide nanodots on oxide substrate: Cu2O on SrTiO3(1 0 0)', Surface Science, vol. 589, no. 1-3, pp. 120-128. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.susc.2005.05.062
Lyubinetsky, I. ; Lea, A. S. ; Thevuthasan, S. ; Baer, D. R. / Formation of epitaxial oxide nanodots on oxide substrate : Cu2O on SrTiO3(1 0 0). In: Surface Science. 2005 ; Vol. 589, No. 1-3. pp. 120-128.
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