Finding opinion manipulation trolls in news community forums

Todor Mihaylov, Georgi D. Georgiev, Preslav Nakov

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The emergence of user forums in electronic news media has given rise to the proliferation of opinion manipulation trolls. Finding such trolls automatically is a hard task, as there is no easy way to recognize or even to define what they are; this also makes it hard to get training and testing data. We solve this issue pragmatically: we assume that a user who is called a troll by several people is likely to be one. We experiment with different variations of this definition, and in each case we show that we can train a classifier to distinguish a likely troll from a non-troll with very high accuracy, 82–95%, thanks to our rich feature set.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCoNLL 2015 - 19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, Proceedings
PublisherAssociation for Computational Linguistics (ACL)
Pages310-314
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781941643778
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015
Event19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, CoNLL 2015 - Beijing, China
Duration: 30 Jul 201531 Jul 2015

Publication series

NameCoNLL 2015 - 19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, Proceedings

Conference

Conference19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, CoNLL 2015
CountryChina
CityBeijing
Period30/7/1531/7/15

Fingerprint

manipulation
Classifiers
news
Testing
proliferation
community
Experiments
electronics
experiment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Mihaylov, T., Georgiev, G. D., & Nakov, P. (2015). Finding opinion manipulation trolls in news community forums. In CoNLL 2015 - 19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, Proceedings (pp. 310-314). (CoNLL 2015 - 19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, Proceedings). Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL).

Finding opinion manipulation trolls in news community forums. / Mihaylov, Todor; Georgiev, Georgi D.; Nakov, Preslav.

CoNLL 2015 - 19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, Proceedings. Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL), 2015. p. 310-314 (CoNLL 2015 - 19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, Proceedings).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mihaylov, T, Georgiev, GD & Nakov, P 2015, Finding opinion manipulation trolls in news community forums. in CoNLL 2015 - 19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, Proceedings. CoNLL 2015 - 19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, Proceedings, Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL), pp. 310-314, 19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, CoNLL 2015, Beijing, China, 30/7/15.
Mihaylov T, Georgiev GD, Nakov P. Finding opinion manipulation trolls in news community forums. In CoNLL 2015 - 19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, Proceedings. Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL). 2015. p. 310-314. (CoNLL 2015 - 19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, Proceedings).
Mihaylov, Todor ; Georgiev, Georgi D. ; Nakov, Preslav. / Finding opinion manipulation trolls in news community forums. CoNLL 2015 - 19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, Proceedings. Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL), 2015. pp. 310-314 (CoNLL 2015 - 19th Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning, Proceedings).
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