Fasting and feasting safely during Ramadan in the patient with diabetes

M. F. Akbani, M. Saleem, W. U. Gadit, M. Ahmed, A. Basit, Rayaz Malik

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are more than one billion Muslims in the world and fasting for Ramadan is an obligatory ritual for all adult Muslims. The majority of Muslims observe absolute fasting (no food or water) between dawn and sunset in the holy month of Ramadan. For people with diabetes who take part in such a fast there are potential benefits and possible risks of hypo- and hyperglycaemia. It is therefore important that medical professionals ensure patients and their relatives (if appropriate) have the knowledge and support to undertake fasting safely. This is as important in India, Pakistan and the Sudan, as it is in the UK, The Netherlands and the USA. This article summarises briefly the religious context of Ramadan together with its potential metabolic impact. It then focuses on providing practical guidance on changes in diet, exercise and drug regimen in patients preparing to fast in Ramadan.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-104
Number of pages5
JournalPractical Diabetes International
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Islam
Fasting
Ceremonial Behavior
Sudan
Pakistan
Hypoglycemia
Hyperglycemia
Netherlands
India
Exercise
Diet
Food
Water
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Asian
  • Drug therapy
  • Fasting
  • Metabolic
  • Ramadan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Fasting and feasting safely during Ramadan in the patient with diabetes. / Akbani, M. F.; Saleem, M.; Gadit, W. U.; Ahmed, M.; Basit, A.; Malik, Rayaz.

In: Practical Diabetes International, Vol. 22, No. 3, 04.2005, p. 100-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Akbani, M. F. ; Saleem, M. ; Gadit, W. U. ; Ahmed, M. ; Basit, A. ; Malik, Rayaz. / Fasting and feasting safely during Ramadan in the patient with diabetes. In: Practical Diabetes International. 2005 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 100-104.
@article{161edfcce0524de88a8c323e351b1599,
title = "Fasting and feasting safely during Ramadan in the patient with diabetes",
abstract = "There are more than one billion Muslims in the world and fasting for Ramadan is an obligatory ritual for all adult Muslims. The majority of Muslims observe absolute fasting (no food or water) between dawn and sunset in the holy month of Ramadan. For people with diabetes who take part in such a fast there are potential benefits and possible risks of hypo- and hyperglycaemia. It is therefore important that medical professionals ensure patients and their relatives (if appropriate) have the knowledge and support to undertake fasting safely. This is as important in India, Pakistan and the Sudan, as it is in the UK, The Netherlands and the USA. This article summarises briefly the religious context of Ramadan together with its potential metabolic impact. It then focuses on providing practical guidance on changes in diet, exercise and drug regimen in patients preparing to fast in Ramadan.",
keywords = "Asian, Drug therapy, Fasting, Metabolic, Ramadan",
author = "Akbani, {M. F.} and M. Saleem and Gadit, {W. U.} and M. Ahmed and A. Basit and Rayaz Malik",
year = "2005",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1002/pdi.767",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "100--104",
journal = "Practical Diabetes",
issn = "2047-2897",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fasting and feasting safely during Ramadan in the patient with diabetes

AU - Akbani, M. F.

AU - Saleem, M.

AU - Gadit, W. U.

AU - Ahmed, M.

AU - Basit, A.

AU - Malik, Rayaz

PY - 2005/4

Y1 - 2005/4

N2 - There are more than one billion Muslims in the world and fasting for Ramadan is an obligatory ritual for all adult Muslims. The majority of Muslims observe absolute fasting (no food or water) between dawn and sunset in the holy month of Ramadan. For people with diabetes who take part in such a fast there are potential benefits and possible risks of hypo- and hyperglycaemia. It is therefore important that medical professionals ensure patients and their relatives (if appropriate) have the knowledge and support to undertake fasting safely. This is as important in India, Pakistan and the Sudan, as it is in the UK, The Netherlands and the USA. This article summarises briefly the religious context of Ramadan together with its potential metabolic impact. It then focuses on providing practical guidance on changes in diet, exercise and drug regimen in patients preparing to fast in Ramadan.

AB - There are more than one billion Muslims in the world and fasting for Ramadan is an obligatory ritual for all adult Muslims. The majority of Muslims observe absolute fasting (no food or water) between dawn and sunset in the holy month of Ramadan. For people with diabetes who take part in such a fast there are potential benefits and possible risks of hypo- and hyperglycaemia. It is therefore important that medical professionals ensure patients and their relatives (if appropriate) have the knowledge and support to undertake fasting safely. This is as important in India, Pakistan and the Sudan, as it is in the UK, The Netherlands and the USA. This article summarises briefly the religious context of Ramadan together with its potential metabolic impact. It then focuses on providing practical guidance on changes in diet, exercise and drug regimen in patients preparing to fast in Ramadan.

KW - Asian

KW - Drug therapy

KW - Fasting

KW - Metabolic

KW - Ramadan

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=23044444806&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=23044444806&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/pdi.767

DO - 10.1002/pdi.767

M3 - Review article

VL - 22

SP - 100

EP - 104

JO - Practical Diabetes

JF - Practical Diabetes

SN - 2047-2897

IS - 3

ER -