Exploring the complex pathways among specific types of technology, self-reported sleep duration and body mass index in UK adolescents

T. Arora, S. Hussain, K. B. Hubert Lam, G. Lily Yao, G. Neil Thomas, Shahrad Taheri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective:To examine the independent associations between sleep duration, four technology types (computer use, mobile telephones, TV viewing and video gaming) and body mass index (BMI) z-score. We propose a theoretical path model showing direct effects of four technology types on BMI z-score and sleep duration as well as the indirect effects of each technology on BMI z-score while considering sleep duration as a mediator.Methods:Consenting adolescents (n=632; 63.9% girls, aged 11-18 years) were recruited to the Midlands Adolescent Schools sleep Education Study. The School Sleep Habits Survey (SSHS) and Technology Use Questionnaire (TUQ) were administered. Objective measures of height (cm) and weight (kg) were obtained for BMI z-score calculation.Results: Weekday use of all technology types was significantly associated with reduced weekday sleep duration after adjustment (β (computer use)=-0.38, P<0.01; β (mobile telephone)=-0.27, P<0.01; β (TV viewing)=-0.35, P<0.01; and β (video gaming)=-0.39, P<0.01). Use of all technology types, with the exception of mobile telephones, was significantly associated with increased BMI z-score after adjustment (β (computer use)=0.26, P<0.01; β (TV viewing)=0.31, P<0.01; and β (video gaming)=0.40, P<0.01). Our path model shows that weekday sleep duration was significantly and negatively associated with BMI z-score (β=-0.40, P<0.01).Conclusion: Weekday sleep duration potentially mediates the effects of some technologies on BMI z-score. If confirmed, improving sleep through better management of technology use could be an achievable intervention for attenuating obesity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1254-1260
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume37
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Sleep
Body Mass Index
Technology
Cell Phones
Social Adjustment
Habits
Theoretical Models
Obesity
Education
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • sleep
  • technology use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Exploring the complex pathways among specific types of technology, self-reported sleep duration and body mass index in UK adolescents. / Arora, T.; Hussain, S.; Hubert Lam, K. B.; Lily Yao, G.; Neil Thomas, G.; Taheri, Shahrad.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 37, No. 9, 09.2013, p. 1254-1260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arora, T. ; Hussain, S. ; Hubert Lam, K. B. ; Lily Yao, G. ; Neil Thomas, G. ; Taheri, Shahrad. / Exploring the complex pathways among specific types of technology, self-reported sleep duration and body mass index in UK adolescents. In: International Journal of Obesity. 2013 ; Vol. 37, No. 9. pp. 1254-1260.
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