Evolution and obesity

Resistance of obese-prone rats to a challenge of food restriction and wheel running

W. D. Pierce, Abdoulaye Diane, C. D. Heth, J. C. Russell, S. D. Proctor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The adaptive hypothesis that an obese-prone genotype confers a fitness advantage when challenged with food restriction and food-related locomotion was tested using a rat model. Juvenile (35-40 days) and adolescent (45-50 days) JCR:LA-cp rats, obese prone (cp/cp) and lean prone (/?), were exposed to 1.5 h daily meals and 22.5 h of voluntary wheel running, a procedure that normally leads to self-starvation. Genotype had a dramatic effect on survival of rats when exposed to the challenge of food restriction and wheel running. Although similar in initial body weight, obese-prone juveniles survived twice as long, and ran three times as far, as their lean-prone counterparts. Biochemical measures indicated that young obese-prone animals maintained blood glucose and fat mass, whereas lean-prone rats depleted these energy reserves. Corticosterone concentration indicated that obese-prone juveniles exhibited a lower stress response to the survival challenge than lean-prone rats, possibly due to lower energy demands and greater energy reserves. Collectively, the findings support the hypothesis that an obese-prone genotype provides a fitness advantage when food supply is inadequate, but is deleterious during periods of food surfeit, such as the energy-rich food environment of prosperous and developing societies worldwide.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)589-592
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Running
Obesity
Food
Genotype
Food Supply
Locomotion
Corticosterone
Starvation
Meals
Blood Glucose
Fats
Body Weight

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Food restriction
  • Genotype
  • Survival
  • Wheel running

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Evolution and obesity : Resistance of obese-prone rats to a challenge of food restriction and wheel running. / Pierce, W. D.; Diane, Abdoulaye; Heth, C. D.; Russell, J. C.; Proctor, S. D.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 34, No. 3, 01.03.2010, p. 589-592.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pierce, W. D. ; Diane, Abdoulaye ; Heth, C. D. ; Russell, J. C. ; Proctor, S. D. / Evolution and obesity : Resistance of obese-prone rats to a challenge of food restriction and wheel running. In: International Journal of Obesity. 2010 ; Vol. 34, No. 3. pp. 589-592.
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