Evaluation of the in vitro and in vivo effects of cyclosporine on the lung T-lymphocyte alveolitis of active pulmonary sarcoidosis

Y. Martinet, P. Pinkston, C. Saltini, J. Spurzem, J. Muller-Quernheim, Ronald Crystal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Pulmonary sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disorder characterized by the accumulation of activated helper/inducer T-lymphocytes in the lower respiratory tract, a process thought to be central to the pathogenesis of the disease. Because cyclosporine, a fungus-derived cyclic peptide, has specific inhibitory effects on T-lymphocyte activation, it should suppress activated sarcoid lung T-cells, and thus it should theoretically be an ideal therapeutic agent for sarcoidosis. This was confirmed in vitro: the addition of cyclosporine to T-cells recovered from the lungs of patients with active sarcoid suppressed the spontaneous release of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and monocyte chemotactic factor by these cells and inhibited their exaggerated spontaneous replication. In contrast, the oral administration of conventional doses (10 mg/kg/day) of cyclosporine to eight of these patients over a 6-month period was not accompanied by suppression of sarcoid lung T-cell activation. On the average, the spontaneous release of IL-2 and monocyte chemotactic factor, the proliferation of lymphocytes, and the number of helper/inducer T-cells present in the lungs of these subjects remained elevated and similar to their pretherapy values. Consistent with this lack of effect on sarcoid lung T-cell activation, no improvement in lung function was observed over the trial period. Thus, although cyclosporine is effective in vitro in suppressing the exaggerated activation of sarcoid lung T-cells, it does not do so in vitro, suggesting this agent will not be useful in the therapy of active pulmonary sarcoidosis, at least when administered in a conventional fashion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1242-1248
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Review of Respiratory Disease
Volume138
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Sarcoidosis
Cyclosporine
T-Lymphocytes
Lung
Chemotactic Factors
Helper-Inducer T-Lymphocytes
Interleukin-2
Monocytes
Cyclic Peptides
Lymphocyte Count
Sarcoidosis
Lymphocyte Activation
In Vitro Techniques
Respiratory System
Oral Administration
Fungi
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Evaluation of the in vitro and in vivo effects of cyclosporine on the lung T-lymphocyte alveolitis of active pulmonary sarcoidosis. / Martinet, Y.; Pinkston, P.; Saltini, C.; Spurzem, J.; Muller-Quernheim, J.; Crystal, Ronald.

In: American Review of Respiratory Disease, Vol. 138, No. 5, 01.01.1988, p. 1242-1248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martinet, Y. ; Pinkston, P. ; Saltini, C. ; Spurzem, J. ; Muller-Quernheim, J. ; Crystal, Ronald. / Evaluation of the in vitro and in vivo effects of cyclosporine on the lung T-lymphocyte alveolitis of active pulmonary sarcoidosis. In: American Review of Respiratory Disease. 1988 ; Vol. 138, No. 5. pp. 1242-1248.
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