Dynamic multiuser resource allocation and adaptation for wireless systems

Khaled Letaief, Ying Jun Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Driven by the increasing popularity of wireless broadband services, future wireless systems will witness a rapid growth of high-data-rate applications with very diverse quality of service requirements. To support, such applications under limited radio resources and harsh wireless channel conditions, dynamic resource allocation, which achieves both higher system spectral efficiency and better QoS, has been identified as one of the most promising techniques. In particular, jointly optimizing resource allocation across adjacent and even nonadjacent layers of the protocol stack leads to dramatic improvement in overall system performance. In this article we provide an overview of recent research on dynamic resource allocation, especially for MIMO and OFDM systems. Recent work and open issues on cross-layer resource allocation and adaptation are also discussed. Through this article, we wish to show that dynamic resource allocation will become a key feature in future wireless communications systems as the sub-scriber population and service demands continue to expand.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1678164
Pages (from-to)38-47
Number of pages10
JournalIEEE Wireless Communications
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Resource allocation
Quality of service
MIMO systems
Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing
Communication systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Media Technology

Cite this

Dynamic multiuser resource allocation and adaptation for wireless systems. / Letaief, Khaled; Zhang, Ying Jun.

In: IEEE Wireless Communications, Vol. 13, No. 4, 1678164, 08.2006, p. 38-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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