Dynamic mechanical properties of PMMA/oganoclay nanocomposite: Experiments and modeling

Rodrigue Matadi Boumbimba, Said Ahzi, Nadia Bahlouli, David Ruch, José Gracio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Similarly to unfilled polymers, the dynamic mechanical properties of polymer/organoclay nanocomposites are sensitive to frequency and temperature, as well as to clay concentration. Richeton (2005, A Unified Model for Stiffness Modulus of Amorphous Polymers Across Transition Temperatures and Strain Rates, Polymer, 46, pp. 8194-8201) has recently proposed a statistical model to describe the storage modulus variation of glassy polymers over a wide range of temperature and frequency. In the present work, we propose to extend this approach for the prediction of the stiffness of polymer composites by using two-phase composite homogenization methods. The phenomenological law developed by Takayanagi, 1966, J. Polym. Sci., 15, pp. 263-281 and the classical bounds proposed by Voigt, 1928, Wied. Ann., 33, pp. 573-587 and Reuss and Angew, 1929, Math. Mech., 29, pp. 9-49 models are used to compute the effective instantaneous moduli, which is then implemented in the Richeton model (Richeton, 2005, A Unified Model for Stiffness Modulus of Amorphous Polymers Across Transition Temperatures and Strain Rates, Polymer, 46, pp. 8194-8201). This adapted formulation has been successfully validated for PMMA/cloisites 20A and 30B nanocomposites. Indeed, good agreement has been obtained between the dynamic mechanical analysis data and the model predictions of poly(methyl-methacrylate)/ organoclay nanocomposites.

Original languageEnglish
Article number030908
JournalJournal of Engineering Materials and Technology, Transactions of the ASME
Volume133
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Polymethyl Methacrylate
Nanocomposites
nanocomposites
Polymers
mechanical properties
Mechanical properties
polymers
Experiments
stiffness
Organoclay
Stiffness
Superconducting transition temperature
strain rate
Strain rate
transition temperature
Homogenization method
composite materials
Composite materials
Dynamic mechanical analysis
homogenizing

Keywords

  • micromechanical modeling
  • organoclay
  • PMMA
  • polymer nanocomposites
  • storage modulus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Dynamic mechanical properties of PMMA/oganoclay nanocomposite : Experiments and modeling. / Boumbimba, Rodrigue Matadi; Ahzi, Said; Bahlouli, Nadia; Ruch, David; Gracio, José.

In: Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology, Transactions of the ASME, Vol. 133, No. 3, 030908, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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