Do Arabs Really read less? "cultural tools" and "more knowledgeable others" as determinants of book reliance in six Arab countries

Justin Martin, Ralph J. Martins, S. Shageaa Naqvi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Book reading in the Arab region is believed to be lower than in regions of similar economic status, but this has not been tested using nationally representative data. This study used the sociocultural theory of learning, particularly the concepts of "more knowledgeable others" and "cultural tools," to examine influences on Arabs' reported book reliance. The study examined print and e-book reliance among Internet users in six Arab countries: Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, Lebanon, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates (Arab respondents n = 3,510; Western and Asian expatriates n = 989). Arab respondents in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, countries with large numbers of expatriates, reported lower book reliance than Asian or Western expatriates, but this was not the case in Qatar. Although numbers of expatriates suitable for similar comparisons were not among data samples collected in Egypt, Lebanon, and Tunisia, Arab respondents in those countries did nonetheless report markedly lower book reliance than non-Arabs elsewhere in the region. Use of news apps and reliance on in-person conversations for news positively predicted reliance, whereas time spent in person with family and friends and frequency of social media posts were negative predictors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3374-3393
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Communication
Volume11
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Arab countries
Application programs
Arab
Internet
determinants
Economics
Qatar
United Arab Emirates
Tunisia
Saudi Arabia
Lebanon
Egypt
news
human being
social media
conversation
learning
economics

Keywords

  • Arab region
  • Book reading
  • E-books
  • Middle East
  • Sociocultural theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Cite this

Do Arabs Really read less? "cultural tools" and "more knowledgeable others" as determinants of book reliance in six Arab countries. / Martin, Justin; Martins, Ralph J.; Naqvi, S. Shageaa.

In: International Journal of Communication, Vol. 11, 01.01.2017, p. 3374-3393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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