Do airway epithelium air-liquid cultures represent the in vivo airway epithelium transcriptome?

Anna Dvorak, Ann E. Tilley, Renat Shaykhiev, Rui Wang, Ronald Crystal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human airway epithelial cells cultured in vitro at the air-liquid interface (ALI) form a pseudostratified epithelium that forms tight junctions and cilia, and produces mucin. These cells are widely used in models of differentiation, injury, and repair. To assess how closely the transcriptome of ALI epithelium matches that of in vivo airway epithelial cells,weusedmicroarrays tocomparethe transcriptome of human large airway epithelial cells cultured at the ALI with the transcriptomeof large airway epitheliumobtainedvia bronchoscopy and brushing. Gene expression profiling showed that global gene expression correlated well between ALI cells and brushed cells, but with some differences. Gene expression patterns mirrored differences in proportions of cell types (ALIs have higher percentages of basal cells, whereas brushed cells have higher percentagesof ciliated cells), that is, ALI cells expressed higher levels of basal cell-related genes, and brushed cells expressed higher levels of cilia-related genes. Pathway analysis showed that ALI cells had increased expression of cell cycle and proliferation genes, whereas brushed cells had increased expression of cytoskeletal organization and humoral immune response genes. Overall, ALI cells provide a good representation of the in vivo airway epithelial transcriptome, but for some biologic questions, the differences between in vitro and in vivo environments need to be considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)465-473
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Transcriptome
Epithelium
Air
Liquids
Genes
Gene expression
Cells
Cilia
Epithelial Cells
Mucins
Repair
Gene Expression
cdc Genes
Tight Junctions
Bronchoscopy
Gene Expression Profiling
Humoral Immunity
Cell Proliferation

Keywords

  • Air-liquid interface
  • Airway epithelium
  • Gene expression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Do airway epithelium air-liquid cultures represent the in vivo airway epithelium transcriptome? / Dvorak, Anna; Tilley, Ann E.; Shaykhiev, Renat; Wang, Rui; Crystal, Ronald.

In: American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, Vol. 44, No. 4, 01.04.2011, p. 465-473.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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