Dietary linolenic acid and carotid atherosclerosis

the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study.

Luc Djoussé, Aaron R. Folsom, Michael A. Province, Steven Hunt, R. Curtis Ellison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Dietary intake of linolenic acid is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. However, it is unknown whether linolenic acid is associated with a lower risk of carotid atherosclerosis. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the association between dietary linolenic acid and the presence of atherosclerotic plaques and the intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries. DESIGN: In a cross-sectional design, we studied 1575 white participants of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study who were free of coronary artery disease, stroke, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. High-resolution ultrasound was used to assess intima-media thickness and the presence of carotid plaques beginning 1 cm below to 1 cm above the carotid bulb. We used logistic regression and a generalized linear model for the analyses. RESULTS: From the lowest to the highest quartile of linolenic acid intake, the prevalence odds ratio (95% CI) of a carotid plaque was 1.0 (reference), 0.47 (0.30, 0.73), 0.38 (0.22, 0.66), and 0.49 (0.26, 0.94), respectively, in a model that adjusted for age, sex, energy intake, waist-to-hip ratio, education, field center, smoking, and the consumption of linoleic acid, saturated fat, fish, and vegetables. Linoleic acid, fish long-chain fatty acids, and fish consumption were not significantly related to carotid artery disease. Linolenic acid was inversely related to thickness of the internal and bifurcation segments of the carotid arteries but not to the common carotid artery. CONCLUSION: Higher consumption of total linolenic acid is associated with a lower prevalence odds of carotid plaques and with lesser thickness of segment-specific carotid intima-media thickness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)819-825
Number of pages7
JournalThe American journal of clinical nutrition
Volume77
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2003
Externally publishedYes

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National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Carotid Artery Diseases
alpha-Linolenic Acid
linolenic acid
atherosclerosis
carotid arteries
lungs
heart
blood
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Fishes
Linoleic Acid
Carotid Arteries
linoleic acid
fatty fish
waist-to-hip ratio
fish consumption
Waist-Hip Ratio
Common Carotid Artery
smoking (food products)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Dietary linolenic acid and carotid atherosclerosis : the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study. / Djoussé, Luc; Folsom, Aaron R.; Province, Michael A.; Hunt, Steven; Ellison, R. Curtis.

In: The American journal of clinical nutrition, Vol. 77, No. 4, 04.2003, p. 819-825.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Djoussé, Luc ; Folsom, Aaron R. ; Province, Michael A. ; Hunt, Steven ; Ellison, R. Curtis. / Dietary linolenic acid and carotid atherosclerosis : the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study. In: The American journal of clinical nutrition. 2003 ; Vol. 77, No. 4. pp. 819-825.
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