Depression, urinary free cortisol excretion and lymphocyte function

Ziad Kronfol, J. D. House, J. Silva, J. Greden, B. J. Carroll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An impairment in lymphocyte response to mitogen stimulation, a correlate of cell-mediated immunity, has been reported in patients with depressive illness. To investigate whether such impairment in lymphocyte function is related to excessive secretion of cortisol, an immunosuppressive hormone, we compared mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation in three groups of subjects: (1) depressed patients with elevated 24-hour urinary free cortisol (UFC) excretion; (2) depressed patients with normal UFC excretion; and (3) normal controls. Depressed patients in both groups showed significant reductions in lymphocyte mitogenic activity, in comparison with the normal controls, but the two depressive groups did not significantly differ from each other in their lymphocytic responses to any of the mitogens used. Furthermore, no significant correlations were found, within depressed patients, between UFC excretion and lymphocyte mitogenic responses. Depression is therefore associated with an impairment in lymphocyte function that cannot be explained solely on the basis of increased cortisol secretion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)70-73
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume148
Issue numberJAN.
Publication statusPublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

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Hydrocortisone
Lymphocytes
Mitogens
Immunosuppressive Agents
Cellular Immunity
Hormones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Kronfol, Z., House, J. D., Silva, J., Greden, J., & Carroll, B. J. (1986). Depression, urinary free cortisol excretion and lymphocyte function. British Journal of Psychiatry, 148(JAN.), 70-73.

Depression, urinary free cortisol excretion and lymphocyte function. / Kronfol, Ziad; House, J. D.; Silva, J.; Greden, J.; Carroll, B. J.

In: British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 148, No. JAN., 1986, p. 70-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kronfol, Z, House, JD, Silva, J, Greden, J & Carroll, BJ 1986, 'Depression, urinary free cortisol excretion and lymphocyte function', British Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 148, no. JAN., pp. 70-73.
Kronfol, Ziad ; House, J. D. ; Silva, J. ; Greden, J. ; Carroll, B. J. / Depression, urinary free cortisol excretion and lymphocyte function. In: British Journal of Psychiatry. 1986 ; Vol. 148, No. JAN. pp. 70-73.
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