Decreasing initial telomere length in humans intergenerationally understates age-associated telomere shortening

Brody Holohan, Tim De Meyer, Kimberly Batten, Massimo Mangino, Steven Hunt, Sofie Bekaert, Marc L. De Buyzere, Ernst R. Rietzschel, Tim D. Spector, Woodring E. Wright, Jerry W. Shay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: Telomere length shortens with aging, and short telomeres have been linked to a wide variety of pathologies. Previous studies suggested a discrepancy in age-associated telomere shortening rate estimated by cross-sectional studies versus the rate measured in longitudinal studies, indicating a potential bias in cross-sectional estimates. Intergenerational changes in initial telomere length, such as that predicted by the previously described effect of a father's age at birth of his offspring (FAB), could explain the discrepancy in shortening rate measurements. We evaluated whether changes occur in initial telomere length over multiple generations in three large datasets and identified paternal birth year (PBY) as a variable that reconciles the difference between longitudinal and cross-sectional measurements. We also clarify the association between FAB and offspring telomere length, demonstrating that this effect is substantially larger than reported in the past. These results indicate the presence of a downward secular trend in telomere length at birth over generational time with potential public health implications.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAging Cell
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Telomere Shortening
Telomere
Parturition
Fathers
Longitudinal Studies
Public Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Pathology

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Genetics
  • Human
  • Parental effects
  • Secular trend
  • Telomerase
  • Telomere length
  • Telomeres

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Decreasing initial telomere length in humans intergenerationally understates age-associated telomere shortening. / Holohan, Brody; De Meyer, Tim; Batten, Kimberly; Mangino, Massimo; Hunt, Steven; Bekaert, Sofie; De Buyzere, Marc L.; Rietzschel, Ernst R.; Spector, Tim D.; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

In: Aging Cell, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Holohan, B, De Meyer, T, Batten, K, Mangino, M, Hunt, S, Bekaert, S, De Buyzere, ML, Rietzschel, ER, Spector, TD, Wright, WE & Shay, JW 2015, 'Decreasing initial telomere length in humans intergenerationally understates age-associated telomere shortening', Aging Cell. https://doi.org/10.1111/acel.12347
Holohan, Brody ; De Meyer, Tim ; Batten, Kimberly ; Mangino, Massimo ; Hunt, Steven ; Bekaert, Sofie ; De Buyzere, Marc L. ; Rietzschel, Ernst R. ; Spector, Tim D. ; Wright, Woodring E. ; Shay, Jerry W. / Decreasing initial telomere length in humans intergenerationally understates age-associated telomere shortening. In: Aging Cell. 2015.
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AU - Holohan, Brody

AU - De Meyer, Tim

AU - Batten, Kimberly

AU - Mangino, Massimo

AU - Hunt, Steven

AU - Bekaert, Sofie

AU - De Buyzere, Marc L.

AU - Rietzschel, Ernst R.

AU - Spector, Tim D.

AU - Wright, Woodring E.

AU - Shay, Jerry W.

PY - 2015

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N2 - Summary: Telomere length shortens with aging, and short telomeres have been linked to a wide variety of pathologies. Previous studies suggested a discrepancy in age-associated telomere shortening rate estimated by cross-sectional studies versus the rate measured in longitudinal studies, indicating a potential bias in cross-sectional estimates. Intergenerational changes in initial telomere length, such as that predicted by the previously described effect of a father's age at birth of his offspring (FAB), could explain the discrepancy in shortening rate measurements. We evaluated whether changes occur in initial telomere length over multiple generations in three large datasets and identified paternal birth year (PBY) as a variable that reconciles the difference between longitudinal and cross-sectional measurements. We also clarify the association between FAB and offspring telomere length, demonstrating that this effect is substantially larger than reported in the past. These results indicate the presence of a downward secular trend in telomere length at birth over generational time with potential public health implications.

AB - Summary: Telomere length shortens with aging, and short telomeres have been linked to a wide variety of pathologies. Previous studies suggested a discrepancy in age-associated telomere shortening rate estimated by cross-sectional studies versus the rate measured in longitudinal studies, indicating a potential bias in cross-sectional estimates. Intergenerational changes in initial telomere length, such as that predicted by the previously described effect of a father's age at birth of his offspring (FAB), could explain the discrepancy in shortening rate measurements. We evaluated whether changes occur in initial telomere length over multiple generations in three large datasets and identified paternal birth year (PBY) as a variable that reconciles the difference between longitudinal and cross-sectional measurements. We also clarify the association between FAB and offspring telomere length, demonstrating that this effect is substantially larger than reported in the past. These results indicate the presence of a downward secular trend in telomere length at birth over generational time with potential public health implications.

KW - Aging

KW - Genetics

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KW - Secular trend

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KW - Telomere length

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