Data-loggers carried on a harness do not adversely affect sheep locomotion

Hannah Hobbs-Chell, Andrew J. King, Hannah Sharratt, Hamed Haddadi, Skye R. Rudiger, Stephen Hailes, A. Jennifer Morton, Alan M. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of externally fitted motion sensors to animal subjects has the potential for allowing researchers to investigate subtle changes in animal movement that may occur with the onset of specific diseases. However, it is crucial to consider whether or not the use of such technology has an effect on the variables measured. Here, we examine the effect of a body harness data logging device on the locomotive patterns of female Merino sheep, Ovis aries. We extracted locomotion variables typical of motion sensor data (stride frequency, stride length, gait type, speed, and limb velocity) from high-definition video collected under controlled conditions. We found no significant difference between the variables measured in the harnessed and unharnessed conditions. Overall, our experiment demonstrates that data-loggers carried on a harness do not adversely affect sheep locomotion, and extended periods of habituation post-instalment of devices should ensure consistency and accuracy of data in future experiments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)549-552
Number of pages4
JournalResearch in Veterinary Science
Volume93
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

harness
Locomotion
locomotion
Sheep
Domestic Sheep
sheep
Equipment and Supplies
sensors (equipment)
Extremities
Research Personnel
gait
Merino
Technology
limbs (animal)
logging
animals
researchers
Walking Speed
Data Accuracy

Keywords

  • Data-loggers
  • Harness
  • Locomotion
  • Motion sensors
  • Radio-collars
  • Sheep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Hobbs-Chell, H., King, A. J., Sharratt, H., Haddadi, H., Rudiger, S. R., Hailes, S., ... Wilson, A. M. (2012). Data-loggers carried on a harness do not adversely affect sheep locomotion. Research in Veterinary Science, 93(1), 549-552. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rvsc.2011.06.007

Data-loggers carried on a harness do not adversely affect sheep locomotion. / Hobbs-Chell, Hannah; King, Andrew J.; Sharratt, Hannah; Haddadi, Hamed; Rudiger, Skye R.; Hailes, Stephen; Morton, A. Jennifer; Wilson, Alan M.

In: Research in Veterinary Science, Vol. 93, No. 1, 01.08.2012, p. 549-552.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hobbs-Chell, H, King, AJ, Sharratt, H, Haddadi, H, Rudiger, SR, Hailes, S, Morton, AJ & Wilson, AM 2012, 'Data-loggers carried on a harness do not adversely affect sheep locomotion', Research in Veterinary Science, vol. 93, no. 1, pp. 549-552. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rvsc.2011.06.007
Hobbs-Chell H, King AJ, Sharratt H, Haddadi H, Rudiger SR, Hailes S et al. Data-loggers carried on a harness do not adversely affect sheep locomotion. Research in Veterinary Science. 2012 Aug 1;93(1):549-552. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rvsc.2011.06.007
Hobbs-Chell, Hannah ; King, Andrew J. ; Sharratt, Hannah ; Haddadi, Hamed ; Rudiger, Skye R. ; Hailes, Stephen ; Morton, A. Jennifer ; Wilson, Alan M. / Data-loggers carried on a harness do not adversely affect sheep locomotion. In: Research in Veterinary Science. 2012 ; Vol. 93, No. 1. pp. 549-552.
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