Cytokines and the brain

Implications for clinical psychiatry

Ziad Kronfol, Daniel G. Remick

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

573 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This article reviews recent developments in cytokine biology that are relevant to clinical psychiatry. Method: The authors reviewed English-language literature of the last 15 years that pertains to the biology of cytokines with emphasis on central nervous system effects in general and psychiatric disorders in particular. Results: Growing evidence suggests that, in addition to providing communication between immune cells, specific cytokines play a role in signaling the brain to produce neurochemical, neuroendocrine, neuroimmune, and behavioral changes. This signaling may be part of a generalized, comprehensive mechanism to mobilize resources in the face of physical and/or psychological stress and to maintain homeostasis. The clinical implications of these findings are far-reaching and include a possible role for cytokines in the pathophysiology of specific psychiatric disorders such as major depression, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. The effects of cytokines in the central nervous system may provide a possible mechanism for the 'sickness behavior' of patients with severe infection or cancer, as well as for the neuropsychiatric adverse effects of treatment with interferons and interleukins. Conclusions: A better understanding of the role of cytokines in various brain activities will enhance knowledge of specific psychobiological mechanisms in health and disease and provide opportunities for novel treatment interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)683-694
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume157
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Psychiatry
Cytokines
Brain
Central Nervous System
Illness Behavior
Interleukins
Psychological Stress
Interferons
Schizophrenia
Alzheimer Disease
Homeostasis
Language
Communication
Depression
Health
Therapeutics
Infection
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Cytokines and the brain : Implications for clinical psychiatry. / Kronfol, Ziad; Remick, Daniel G.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 157, No. 5, 05.2000, p. 683-694.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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