Corneal confocal microscopy as a tool for detecting diabetic polyneuropathy in a cohort with screen-detected type 2 diabetes

ADDITION-Denmark

Signe T. Andersen, Kasper Grosen, Hatice Tankisi, Morten Charles, Niels T. Andersen, Henning Andersen, Ioannis N. Petropoulos, Rayaz Malik, Troels S. Jensen, Pall Karlsson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: In this cross-sectional study, we explored the utility of corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) measures for detecting diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) and their association with clinical variables, in a cohort with type 2 diabetes. Methods: CCM, nerve conduction studies, and assessment of symptoms and clinical deficits of DPN were undertaken in 144 participants with type 2 diabetes and 25 controls. DPN was defined according to the Toronto criteria for confirmed DPN. Results: Corneal nerve fiber density (CNFD) was lower both in participants with confirmed DPN (n = 27) and in participants without confirmed DPN (n = 117) compared with controls (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01, respectively). No differences were observed for CNFD (P = 0.98) between participants with and without DPN. There were no differences in CNFL and CNBD between groups (P = 0.06 and P = 0.29, respectively). CNFD was associated with age, height, total- and LDL cholesterol. Conclusions: CCM could not distinguish patients with and without neuropathy, but CNFD was lower in patients with type 2 diabetes compared to controls. Age may influence the level of CCM measures.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Diabetes and its Complications
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Diabetic Neuropathies
Denmark
Confocal Microscopy
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Nerve Fibers
Symptom Assessment
Neural Conduction
LDL Cholesterol
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Corneal confocal microscopy
  • Diabetes
  • Diabetic complication
  • Diabetic polyneuropathy
  • Toronto consensus criteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Corneal confocal microscopy as a tool for detecting diabetic polyneuropathy in a cohort with screen-detected type 2 diabetes : ADDITION-Denmark. / Andersen, Signe T.; Grosen, Kasper; Tankisi, Hatice; Charles, Morten; Andersen, Niels T.; Andersen, Henning; Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Malik, Rayaz; Jensen, Troels S.; Karlsson, Pall.

In: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Andersen, Signe T. ; Grosen, Kasper ; Tankisi, Hatice ; Charles, Morten ; Andersen, Niels T. ; Andersen, Henning ; Petropoulos, Ioannis N. ; Malik, Rayaz ; Jensen, Troels S. ; Karlsson, Pall. / Corneal confocal microscopy as a tool for detecting diabetic polyneuropathy in a cohort with screen-detected type 2 diabetes : ADDITION-Denmark. In: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications. 2018.
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