Control design via TAM and H approaches

A flexible beam case study

T. S. Tang, Garng Morton Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

The target approximation method (TAM) and H control theory are used to design robust vibration control of a flexible beam. The beam dynamics are approximated by a few lower order vibration modes of the beam. The remaining modes are treated as a modeling error. In the closed-loop system the uncontrolled and controlled modes interact through the control and observation spillovers, which cause a degraded system performance. The TAM solves the problem in the time domain by designing gains and actuator and sensor locations such that the closed-loop system imitates a target which has no spillovers. The H approach tackles the problem in the frequency domain by designing a controller which attenuates a class of disturbing signals, including the disturbance generated by the uncontrolled modes. The TAM always gives a lower order controller than the H approach. The H approach might not be a good solution for the spillover effect minimization problem when the controller can only have a low-order estimator. The H gains are much greater than the TAM gains. This implies that the H controller consumes more power than the TAM controller.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2060-2061
Number of pages2
JournalProceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control
Volume4
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Flexible Beam
Control Design
Approximation Methods
Controllers
Target
Controller
Closed loop systems
Closed-loop System
Vibration control
Robust control
Vibration Control
Control theory
Modeling Error
Robust Control
Control Theory
Actuators
Minimization Problem
Frequency Domain
Time Domain
System Performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Modelling and Simulation
  • Control and Optimization

Cite this

Control design via TAM and H approaches : A flexible beam case study. / Tang, T. S.; Huang, Garng Morton.

In: Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Vol. 4, 01.12.1990, p. 2060-2061.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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