Cocaine analog coupled to disrupted adenovirus

A vaccine strategy to evoke high-titer immunity against addictive drugs

Martin J. Hicks, Bishnu P. De, Jonathan B. Rosenberg, Jesse T. Davidson, Amira Y. Moreno, Kim D. Janda, Sunmee Wee, George F. Koob, Neil R. Hackett, Stephen M. Kaminsky, Stefan Worgall, Miklos Toth, Jason G. Mezey, Ronald Crystal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on the concept that anticocaine antibodies could prevent inhaled cocaine from reaching its target receptors in the brain, an effective anticocaine vaccine could help reverse cocaine addiction. Leveraging the knowledge that E1- E3- adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors are potent immunogens, we have developed a novel vaccine platform for addictive drugs by covalently linking a cocaine analog to the capsid proteins of noninfectious, disrupted Ad vector. The Ad-based anticocaine vaccine evokes high-titer anticocaine antibodies in mice sufficient to completely reverse, on a persistent basis, the hyperlocomotor activity induced by intravenous administration of cocaine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)612-619
Number of pages8
JournalMolecular Therapy
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Adenovirus Vaccines
Cocaine
Adenoviridae
Immunity
Vaccines
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cocaine-Related Disorders
Antibodies
Capsid Proteins
Intravenous Administration
Brain
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

Cocaine analog coupled to disrupted adenovirus : A vaccine strategy to evoke high-titer immunity against addictive drugs. / Hicks, Martin J.; De, Bishnu P.; Rosenberg, Jonathan B.; Davidson, Jesse T.; Moreno, Amira Y.; Janda, Kim D.; Wee, Sunmee; Koob, George F.; Hackett, Neil R.; Kaminsky, Stephen M.; Worgall, Stefan; Toth, Miklos; Mezey, Jason G.; Crystal, Ronald.

In: Molecular Therapy, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.03.2011, p. 612-619.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hicks, MJ, De, BP, Rosenberg, JB, Davidson, JT, Moreno, AY, Janda, KD, Wee, S, Koob, GF, Hackett, NR, Kaminsky, SM, Worgall, S, Toth, M, Mezey, JG & Crystal, R 2011, 'Cocaine analog coupled to disrupted adenovirus: A vaccine strategy to evoke high-titer immunity against addictive drugs', Molecular Therapy, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 612-619. https://doi.org/10.1038/mt.2010.280
Hicks, Martin J. ; De, Bishnu P. ; Rosenberg, Jonathan B. ; Davidson, Jesse T. ; Moreno, Amira Y. ; Janda, Kim D. ; Wee, Sunmee ; Koob, George F. ; Hackett, Neil R. ; Kaminsky, Stephen M. ; Worgall, Stefan ; Toth, Miklos ; Mezey, Jason G. ; Crystal, Ronald. / Cocaine analog coupled to disrupted adenovirus : A vaccine strategy to evoke high-titer immunity against addictive drugs. In: Molecular Therapy. 2011 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 612-619.
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