Clinical features of nosocomial rotavirus infection in pediatric liver transplant recipients

S. W. Fitts, M. Green, J. Reyes, Bakr Nour, A. G. Tzakis, S. A. Kocoshis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A retrospective survey of nosocomial rotavirus infection in pediatric liver transplant recipients was performed. Immunocompetent children with nosocomial infections served as controls. Co-pathogens were not identified. A total of 12 transplant cases and 12 controls could be evaluated. New onset vomiting occurred in 7/8 cases and 6/11 controls lasting an average of 2.8 days per case and 0.8 days per control (p < .05). New onset fever (> 38°C) was noted in 8/12 cases and 9/12 controls. New onset occult blood was noted in 7/11 cases and 1/12 controls (p < .01). A concomitant rise and fall in transaminases was noted in 5/12 transplant recipients. Eleven of the 12 were maintained on constant or increased immunosuppression doses without the development of fulminant disease. The presence of increased days of vomiting and occult blood in stools suggests that rotavirus causes a more invasive process in the intestinal mucosa of transplant recipients compared to immunocompetent children. However, the process remains self-limited despite the use of potent immunosuppressives.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)201-204
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume9
Issue number3 I
Publication statusPublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rotavirus Infections
Cross Infection
Occult Blood
Pediatrics
Vomiting
Liver
Rotavirus
Intestinal Mucosa
Immunosuppressive Agents
Transaminases
Immunosuppression
Transplants
Transplant Recipients

Keywords

  • Cross infection
  • Liver transplant
  • Rotavirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Fitts, S. W., Green, M., Reyes, J., Nour, B., Tzakis, A. G., & Kocoshis, S. A. (1995). Clinical features of nosocomial rotavirus infection in pediatric liver transplant recipients. Clinical Transplantation, 9(3 I), 201-204.

Clinical features of nosocomial rotavirus infection in pediatric liver transplant recipients. / Fitts, S. W.; Green, M.; Reyes, J.; Nour, Bakr; Tzakis, A. G.; Kocoshis, S. A.

In: Clinical Transplantation, Vol. 9, No. 3 I, 1995, p. 201-204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fitts, SW, Green, M, Reyes, J, Nour, B, Tzakis, AG & Kocoshis, SA 1995, 'Clinical features of nosocomial rotavirus infection in pediatric liver transplant recipients', Clinical Transplantation, vol. 9, no. 3 I, pp. 201-204.
Fitts, S. W. ; Green, M. ; Reyes, J. ; Nour, Bakr ; Tzakis, A. G. ; Kocoshis, S. A. / Clinical features of nosocomial rotavirus infection in pediatric liver transplant recipients. In: Clinical Transplantation. 1995 ; Vol. 9, No. 3 I. pp. 201-204.
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