Characterization of the inflammatory and immune effector cells in the lung parenchyma of patients with interstitial lung disease

G. W. Hunninghake, O. Kawanami, V. J. Ferrans, R. C. Young, W. C. Roberts, Ronald Crystal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

147 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pathogenesis of the interstitial lung disorders is intimately related to the number, type, and state of activation of inflammatory and immune effector cells (the alveolitis) within the alveolar structures. To directly characterize the type and status of the cells comprising the alveolitis of various interstitial lung disorders, a method was developed to isolate inflammatory and immune effector cells from open lung biopsies of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 9) and sarcoidosis (n = 6). The cells isolated from these biopsies were compared with effector cells obtained from normal lung (n = 3). The effector cell populations in normal lung contained alveolar macrophages (84 ± 17%), lymphocytes (16 ± 4%), and rare polymorphonuclear leukocytes (<1%); of the lymphocytes present, 73 ± 4% were T-lymphocytes, 7 ± 2% were 'activated' T-lymphocytes, and 9 ± 2% were B-lymphocytes. In contrast, a characteristic feature of the alveolitis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was the presence of increased proportions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, primarily neutrophils (18 ± 4%); the percentages of lymphocytes and various lymphocyte subpopulations were similar to those found in the normal lung. By comparison, the alveolitis of sarcoidosis was characterized by the presence of increased proportions of lymphocytes (57 ± 7%). T-lymphocytes (91 ± 5%), and 'activated' T-lymphocytes (19 ± 4%); neutrophils were rarely found in the lung of nonsmoking patients with sarcoidosis. The proportions of various inflammatory and immune effector cells isolated from the lung of normal subjects as well as from biopsies of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis were similar to those cell populations that were present in the respective bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Thus, the alveolitis of the interstitial lung diseases can be directly characterized by the types of inflammatory and immune effector cells present within the lung parenchyma. In addition, the cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage accurately reflect the alveolitis of these disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)407-412
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Review of Respiratory Disease
Volume123
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jul 1981
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Interstitial Lung Diseases
Lung
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
Neutrophils
Sarcoidosis
Lymphocytes
T-Lymphocytes
Biopsy
Pulmonary Sarcoidosis
Lymphocyte Subsets
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid
Alveolar Macrophages
Bronchoalveolar Lavage
Population
B-Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Characterization of the inflammatory and immune effector cells in the lung parenchyma of patients with interstitial lung disease. / Hunninghake, G. W.; Kawanami, O.; Ferrans, V. J.; Young, R. C.; Roberts, W. C.; Crystal, Ronald.

In: American Review of Respiratory Disease, Vol. 123, No. 4, 20.07.1981, p. 407-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hunninghake, G. W. ; Kawanami, O. ; Ferrans, V. J. ; Young, R. C. ; Roberts, W. C. ; Crystal, Ronald. / Characterization of the inflammatory and immune effector cells in the lung parenchyma of patients with interstitial lung disease. In: American Review of Respiratory Disease. 1981 ; Vol. 123, No. 4. pp. 407-412.
@article{f076b4358c7e46b4b09ca160e0a7bfa9,
title = "Characterization of the inflammatory and immune effector cells in the lung parenchyma of patients with interstitial lung disease",
abstract = "The pathogenesis of the interstitial lung disorders is intimately related to the number, type, and state of activation of inflammatory and immune effector cells (the alveolitis) within the alveolar structures. To directly characterize the type and status of the cells comprising the alveolitis of various interstitial lung disorders, a method was developed to isolate inflammatory and immune effector cells from open lung biopsies of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 9) and sarcoidosis (n = 6). The cells isolated from these biopsies were compared with effector cells obtained from normal lung (n = 3). The effector cell populations in normal lung contained alveolar macrophages (84 ± 17{\%}), lymphocytes (16 ± 4{\%}), and rare polymorphonuclear leukocytes (<1{\%}); of the lymphocytes present, 73 ± 4{\%} were T-lymphocytes, 7 ± 2{\%} were 'activated' T-lymphocytes, and 9 ± 2{\%} were B-lymphocytes. In contrast, a characteristic feature of the alveolitis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was the presence of increased proportions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, primarily neutrophils (18 ± 4{\%}); the percentages of lymphocytes and various lymphocyte subpopulations were similar to those found in the normal lung. By comparison, the alveolitis of sarcoidosis was characterized by the presence of increased proportions of lymphocytes (57 ± 7{\%}). T-lymphocytes (91 ± 5{\%}), and 'activated' T-lymphocytes (19 ± 4{\%}); neutrophils were rarely found in the lung of nonsmoking patients with sarcoidosis. The proportions of various inflammatory and immune effector cells isolated from the lung of normal subjects as well as from biopsies of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis were similar to those cell populations that were present in the respective bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Thus, the alveolitis of the interstitial lung diseases can be directly characterized by the types of inflammatory and immune effector cells present within the lung parenchyma. In addition, the cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage accurately reflect the alveolitis of these disorders.",
author = "Hunninghake, {G. W.} and O. Kawanami and Ferrans, {V. J.} and Young, {R. C.} and Roberts, {W. C.} and Ronald Crystal",
year = "1981",
month = "7",
day = "20",
language = "English",
volume = "123",
pages = "407--412",
journal = "American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine",
issn = "1073-449X",
publisher = "American Thoracic Society",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characterization of the inflammatory and immune effector cells in the lung parenchyma of patients with interstitial lung disease

AU - Hunninghake, G. W.

AU - Kawanami, O.

AU - Ferrans, V. J.

AU - Young, R. C.

AU - Roberts, W. C.

AU - Crystal, Ronald

PY - 1981/7/20

Y1 - 1981/7/20

N2 - The pathogenesis of the interstitial lung disorders is intimately related to the number, type, and state of activation of inflammatory and immune effector cells (the alveolitis) within the alveolar structures. To directly characterize the type and status of the cells comprising the alveolitis of various interstitial lung disorders, a method was developed to isolate inflammatory and immune effector cells from open lung biopsies of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 9) and sarcoidosis (n = 6). The cells isolated from these biopsies were compared with effector cells obtained from normal lung (n = 3). The effector cell populations in normal lung contained alveolar macrophages (84 ± 17%), lymphocytes (16 ± 4%), and rare polymorphonuclear leukocytes (<1%); of the lymphocytes present, 73 ± 4% were T-lymphocytes, 7 ± 2% were 'activated' T-lymphocytes, and 9 ± 2% were B-lymphocytes. In contrast, a characteristic feature of the alveolitis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was the presence of increased proportions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, primarily neutrophils (18 ± 4%); the percentages of lymphocytes and various lymphocyte subpopulations were similar to those found in the normal lung. By comparison, the alveolitis of sarcoidosis was characterized by the presence of increased proportions of lymphocytes (57 ± 7%). T-lymphocytes (91 ± 5%), and 'activated' T-lymphocytes (19 ± 4%); neutrophils were rarely found in the lung of nonsmoking patients with sarcoidosis. The proportions of various inflammatory and immune effector cells isolated from the lung of normal subjects as well as from biopsies of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis were similar to those cell populations that were present in the respective bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Thus, the alveolitis of the interstitial lung diseases can be directly characterized by the types of inflammatory and immune effector cells present within the lung parenchyma. In addition, the cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage accurately reflect the alveolitis of these disorders.

AB - The pathogenesis of the interstitial lung disorders is intimately related to the number, type, and state of activation of inflammatory and immune effector cells (the alveolitis) within the alveolar structures. To directly characterize the type and status of the cells comprising the alveolitis of various interstitial lung disorders, a method was developed to isolate inflammatory and immune effector cells from open lung biopsies of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 9) and sarcoidosis (n = 6). The cells isolated from these biopsies were compared with effector cells obtained from normal lung (n = 3). The effector cell populations in normal lung contained alveolar macrophages (84 ± 17%), lymphocytes (16 ± 4%), and rare polymorphonuclear leukocytes (<1%); of the lymphocytes present, 73 ± 4% were T-lymphocytes, 7 ± 2% were 'activated' T-lymphocytes, and 9 ± 2% were B-lymphocytes. In contrast, a characteristic feature of the alveolitis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was the presence of increased proportions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, primarily neutrophils (18 ± 4%); the percentages of lymphocytes and various lymphocyte subpopulations were similar to those found in the normal lung. By comparison, the alveolitis of sarcoidosis was characterized by the presence of increased proportions of lymphocytes (57 ± 7%). T-lymphocytes (91 ± 5%), and 'activated' T-lymphocytes (19 ± 4%); neutrophils were rarely found in the lung of nonsmoking patients with sarcoidosis. The proportions of various inflammatory and immune effector cells isolated from the lung of normal subjects as well as from biopsies of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis were similar to those cell populations that were present in the respective bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Thus, the alveolitis of the interstitial lung diseases can be directly characterized by the types of inflammatory and immune effector cells present within the lung parenchyma. In addition, the cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage accurately reflect the alveolitis of these disorders.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0019433280&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0019433280&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7224352

AN - SCOPUS:0019433280

VL - 123

SP - 407

EP - 412

JO - American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

JF - American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

SN - 1073-449X

IS - 4

ER -