Channel characterization for acoustic downhole communication systems

Abdallah K. Farraj, Scott L. Miller, Khalid Qaraqe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability to communicate between downhole and surface instruments became a critical need as well operators monitor flow rate, temperature, and pressure data to facilitate well performance optimization and maintenance. The use of wire lines for communication between downhole and surface is common, but these installations present cost, maintenance, and reliability issues. Wireless communications technology using acoustic waves is an interesting alternative to these wired systems. While the acoustic technology offers great benefits, a clear understanding of its propagation aspects inside the wells is lacking. A testbed was built to investigate the propagation of acoustic signals over production pipes. The testbed comprises an acoustic tool that transmits data to the well surface without cables, an internally-developed receiver unit, and five segments of 7 inch production tubing that form a pipe string. Acoustic waves propagate in this setup by vibrating the pipes' body, without interfering with the surrounding medium. Moreover, to study the effect of cemented pipes on wave propagation, the third pipe segment was encased in concrete. An impulse signal was fed to the acoustic tool, and channel impulse response readings were taken along the pipe string. The measurements were analyzed to understand the propagation aspects of acoustic waves. This work shows that acoustic waves experience dispersion and frequency-dependent attenuation over the pipe string; the pipe string appears as a frequency selective channel. The concrete segment filters out a considerable amount of energy in the higher frequency band and introduces further attenuation and dispersion. Signal processing algorithms are proposed to reduce the distortion and dispersion introduced by the pipe string channel on the acoustic waves. Technical contributions include: finding the impulse response of the channel along the pipe string, investigating the power delay profile, power spectral density, and signal-to-noise ratio measures, and studying the channel dispersion parameters.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSociety of Petroleum Engineers - SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition 2012, ATCE 2012: Unconventional Wisdom
Pages1206-1217
Number of pages12
Volume2
Publication statusPublished - 2012
EventSPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition 2012: Unconventional Wisdom, ATCE 2012 - San Antonio, TX, United States
Duration: 8 Oct 201210 Oct 2012

Other

OtherSPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition 2012: Unconventional Wisdom, ATCE 2012
CountryUnited States
CitySan Antonio, TX
Period8/10/1210/10/12

Fingerprint

Communication systems
Acoustics
Pipe
Acoustic waves
Testbeds
Impulse response
Concretes
Communication
Power spectral density
Tubing
Wave propagation
Frequency bands
Signal to noise ratio
Signal processing
Cables
Flow rate
Wire
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Fuel Technology

Cite this

Farraj, A. K., Miller, S. L., & Qaraqe, K. (2012). Channel characterization for acoustic downhole communication systems. In Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition 2012, ATCE 2012: Unconventional Wisdom (Vol. 2, pp. 1206-1217)

Channel characterization for acoustic downhole communication systems. / Farraj, Abdallah K.; Miller, Scott L.; Qaraqe, Khalid.

Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition 2012, ATCE 2012: Unconventional Wisdom. Vol. 2 2012. p. 1206-1217.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Farraj, AK, Miller, SL & Qaraqe, K 2012, Channel characterization for acoustic downhole communication systems. in Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition 2012, ATCE 2012: Unconventional Wisdom. vol. 2, pp. 1206-1217, SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition 2012: Unconventional Wisdom, ATCE 2012, San Antonio, TX, United States, 8/10/12.
Farraj AK, Miller SL, Qaraqe K. Channel characterization for acoustic downhole communication systems. In Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition 2012, ATCE 2012: Unconventional Wisdom. Vol. 2. 2012. p. 1206-1217
Farraj, Abdallah K. ; Miller, Scott L. ; Qaraqe, Khalid. / Channel characterization for acoustic downhole communication systems. Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition 2012, ATCE 2012: Unconventional Wisdom. Vol. 2 2012. pp. 1206-1217
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