Cardiac tissue slices

Preparation, handling, and successful optical mapping

Ken Wang, Peter Lee, Gary R. Mirams, Padmini Sarathchandra, Thomas K. Borg, David J. Gavaghan, Peter Kohl, Christian Bollensdorff

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Cardiac tissue slices are becoming increasingly popular as a model system for cardiac electrophysiology and pharmacology research and development. Here, we describe in detail the preparation, handling, and optical mapping of transmembrane potential and intracellular free calcium concentration transients (CaT) in ventricular tissue slices from guinea pigs and rabbits. Slices cut in the epicardium-tangential plane contained wellaligned in-slice myocardial cell strands (“fibers”) in subepicardial and midmyocardial sections. Cut with a high-precision slow-advancing microtome at a thickness of 350 to 400 µm, tissue slices preserved essential action potential (AP) properties of the precutting Langendorff- perfused heart. We identified the need for a postcutting recovery period of 36 min (guinea pig) and 63 min (rabbit) to reach 97.5% of final steady-state values for AP duration (APD) (identified by exponential fitting). There was no significant difference between the postcutting recovery dynamics in slices obtained using 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime or blebistatin as electromechanical uncouplers during the cutting process. A rapid increase in APD, seen after cutting, was caused by exposure to ice-cold solution during the slicing procedure, not by tissue injury, differences in uncouplers, or pH-buffers (bicarbonate; HEPES). To characterize intrinsic patterns of CaT, AP, and conduction, a combination of multipoint and field stimulation should be used to avoid misinterpretation based on source-sink effects. In summary, we describe in detail the preparation, mapping, and data analysis approaches for reproducible cardiac tissue slice-based investigations into AP and CaT dynamics.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)H1112-H1125
    JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
    Volume308
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Fingerprint

    Action Potentials
    Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging
    Guinea Pigs
    Cardiac Electrophysiology
    Rabbits
    HEPES
    Pericardium
    Ice
    Bicarbonates
    Buffers
    Pharmacology
    Calcium
    Wounds and Injuries
    Research

    Keywords

    • Heart
    • High spatial resolution
    • Live tissue slices
    • Multiparametric
    • Optical mapping
    • Voltage-and calcium-sensitive dyes

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Physiology
    • Physiology (medical)
    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

    Cite this

    Wang, K., Lee, P., Mirams, G. R., Sarathchandra, P., Borg, T. K., Gavaghan, D. J., ... Bollensdorff, C. (2015). Cardiac tissue slices: Preparation, handling, and successful optical mapping. American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 308(9), H1112-H1125. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpheart.00556.2014

    Cardiac tissue slices : Preparation, handling, and successful optical mapping. / Wang, Ken; Lee, Peter; Mirams, Gary R.; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Borg, Thomas K.; Gavaghan, David J.; Kohl, Peter; Bollensdorff, Christian.

    In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 308, No. 9, 2015, p. H1112-H1125.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Wang, K, Lee, P, Mirams, GR, Sarathchandra, P, Borg, TK, Gavaghan, DJ, Kohl, P & Bollensdorff, C 2015, 'Cardiac tissue slices: Preparation, handling, and successful optical mapping', American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, vol. 308, no. 9, pp. H1112-H1125. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpheart.00556.2014
    Wang, Ken ; Lee, Peter ; Mirams, Gary R. ; Sarathchandra, Padmini ; Borg, Thomas K. ; Gavaghan, David J. ; Kohl, Peter ; Bollensdorff, Christian. / Cardiac tissue slices : Preparation, handling, and successful optical mapping. In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 2015 ; Vol. 308, No. 9. pp. H1112-H1125.
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