Cancer and inflammation

Promise for biologic therapy

Sandra Demaria, Eli Pikarsky, Michael Karin, Lisa M. Coussens, Yen Ching Chen, Emad M. El-Omar, Giorgio Trinchieri, Steven M. Dubinett, Jenny T. Mao, Eva Szabo, Arthur Krieg, George J. Weiner, Bernard A. Fox, George Coukos, Ena Wang, Robert T. Abraham, Michele Carbone, Michael T. Lotze

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

213 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cancers often arise as the end stage of inflammation in adults, but not in children. As such there is a complex interplay between host immune cells during neoplastic development, with both an ability to promote cancer and limit or eliminate it, most often complicit with the host. In humans, defining inflammation and the presence of inflammatory cells within or surrounding the tumor is a critical aspect of modern pathology. Groups defining staging for neoplasms are strongly encouraged to assess and incorporate measures of the presence of apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis and also the nature and quality of the immune infiltrate. Both environmental and genetic factors enhance the risk of cigarette smoking, Helicobacter pylori, hepatitis B/C, human papilloma virus, solar irradiation, asbestos, pancreatitis, or other causes of chronic inflammation. Identifying suitable genetic polymorphisms in cytokines, cytokine receptors, and Toll-like receptors among other immune response genes is also seen as high value as genomic sequencing becomes less expensive. Animal models that incorporate and assess not only the genetic anlagen but also the inflammatory cells and the presence of microbial pathogens and damage-associated molecular pattern molecules are necessary. Identifying micro-RNAs involved in regulating the response to damage or injury are seen as highly promising. Although no therapeutic strategies to prevent or treat cancers based on insights into inflammatory pathways are currently approved for the common epithelial malignancies, there remains substantial interest in agents targeting COX2 or PPARγ, ethyl pyruvate and steroids, and several novel agents on the horizon.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-351
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Immunotherapy
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Biological Therapy
Inflammation
Neoplasms
Papillomaviridae
Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors
Cytokine Receptors
Aptitude
Neoplasm Staging
Toll-Like Receptors
Asbestos
Autophagy
Genetic Polymorphisms
Hepatitis C
Hepatitis B
MicroRNAs
Helicobacter pylori
Pancreatitis
Necrosis
Animal Models
Smoking

Keywords

  • Chronic inflammation
  • COX2
  • Cytokine polymorphisms
  • Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (damps)
  • Ethyl pyruvate
  • Hmgb1
  • Innate immunity
  • Pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules (pamps)
  • Steroids
  • Tgfβ

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Cancer Research
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Demaria, S., Pikarsky, E., Karin, M., Coussens, L. M., Chen, Y. C., El-Omar, E. M., ... Lotze, M. T. (2010). Cancer and inflammation: Promise for biologic therapy. Journal of Immunotherapy, 33(4), 335-351. https://doi.org/10.1097/CJI.0b013e3181d32e74

Cancer and inflammation : Promise for biologic therapy. / Demaria, Sandra; Pikarsky, Eli; Karin, Michael; Coussens, Lisa M.; Chen, Yen Ching; El-Omar, Emad M.; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Dubinett, Steven M.; Mao, Jenny T.; Szabo, Eva; Krieg, Arthur; Weiner, George J.; Fox, Bernard A.; Coukos, George; Wang, Ena; Abraham, Robert T.; Carbone, Michele; Lotze, Michael T.

In: Journal of Immunotherapy, Vol. 33, No. 4, 05.2010, p. 335-351.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Demaria, S, Pikarsky, E, Karin, M, Coussens, LM, Chen, YC, El-Omar, EM, Trinchieri, G, Dubinett, SM, Mao, JT, Szabo, E, Krieg, A, Weiner, GJ, Fox, BA, Coukos, G, Wang, E, Abraham, RT, Carbone, M & Lotze, MT 2010, 'Cancer and inflammation: Promise for biologic therapy', Journal of Immunotherapy, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 335-351. https://doi.org/10.1097/CJI.0b013e3181d32e74
Demaria S, Pikarsky E, Karin M, Coussens LM, Chen YC, El-Omar EM et al. Cancer and inflammation: Promise for biologic therapy. Journal of Immunotherapy. 2010 May;33(4):335-351. https://doi.org/10.1097/CJI.0b013e3181d32e74
Demaria, Sandra ; Pikarsky, Eli ; Karin, Michael ; Coussens, Lisa M. ; Chen, Yen Ching ; El-Omar, Emad M. ; Trinchieri, Giorgio ; Dubinett, Steven M. ; Mao, Jenny T. ; Szabo, Eva ; Krieg, Arthur ; Weiner, George J. ; Fox, Bernard A. ; Coukos, George ; Wang, Ena ; Abraham, Robert T. ; Carbone, Michele ; Lotze, Michael T. / Cancer and inflammation : Promise for biologic therapy. In: Journal of Immunotherapy. 2010 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 335-351.
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