Camera brand congruence in the Flickr social graph

Adish Singla, Ingmar Weber

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Given that my friends on Flickr use cameras of brand X, am I more likely to also use a camera of brand X? Given that one of these friends changes her brand, am I likely to do the same? These are the kind of questions addressed in this work. Direct applications involve personalized advertising in social networks. For our study we crawled a complete connected component of the Flickr friendship graph with a total of 67M edges and 3.9M users. Camera brands and models were assigned to users and time slots according to the model specific meta data pertaining to their images taken during these time slots. Similarly, we used, where provided in a user's profile, information about a user's geographic location and the groups joined on Flickr. Our main findings are the following. First, a pair of friends on Flickr has a significantly higher probability of being congruent, i.e., using the same brand, compared to two random users (27% vs. 19%). Second, the degree of congruence goes up for pairs of friends (i) in the same country (29%), (ii) who both only have very few friends (30%), and (iii) with a very high cliqueness1 (38%). Third, given that a user changes her camera model between March-May 2007 and March-May 2008, high cliqueness friends are more likely than random users to do the same (54% vs. 48%). Fourth, users using high-end cameras2 are far more loyal to their brand than users using point-and-shoot cameras, with a probability of staying with the same brand of 60% vs 33%, given that a new camera is bought. Fifth, these "expert" users' brand congruence reaches 66% (!) for high cliqueness friends. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that the phenomenon of brand congruence is studied for hundreds of thousands of users and over a period of two years.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2nd ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, WSDM'09
Pages252-261
Number of pages10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Sep 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event2nd ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, WSDM'09 - Barcelona, Spain
Duration: 9 Feb 200912 Feb 2009

Other

Other2nd ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, WSDM'09
CountrySpain
CityBarcelona
Period9/2/0912/2/09

Fingerprint

Cameras
Metadata
Marketing

Keywords

  • Brand congruence
  • Brand loyalty
  • Flickr
  • Social network

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Software

Cite this

Singla, A., & Weber, I. (2009). Camera brand congruence in the Flickr social graph. In Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, WSDM'09 (pp. 252-261) https://doi.org/10.1145/1498759.1498834

Camera brand congruence in the Flickr social graph. / Singla, Adish; Weber, Ingmar.

Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, WSDM'09. 2009. p. 252-261.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Singla, A & Weber, I 2009, Camera brand congruence in the Flickr social graph. in Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, WSDM'09. pp. 252-261, 2nd ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, WSDM'09, Barcelona, Spain, 9/2/09. https://doi.org/10.1145/1498759.1498834
Singla A, Weber I. Camera brand congruence in the Flickr social graph. In Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, WSDM'09. 2009. p. 252-261 https://doi.org/10.1145/1498759.1498834
Singla, Adish ; Weber, Ingmar. / Camera brand congruence in the Flickr social graph. Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, WSDM'09. 2009. pp. 252-261
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