Calcium signaling differentiation during Xenopus oocyte maturation

Wassim El-Jouni, Byungwoo Jang, Shirley Haun, Khaled Machaca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ca2+ is the universal signal for egg activation at fertilization in all sexually reproducing species. The Ca2+ signal at fertilization is necessary for egg activation and exhibits specialized spatial and temporal dynamics. Eggs acquire the ability to produce the fertilization-specific Ca2+ signal during oocyte maturation. However, the mechanisms regulating Ca2+ signaling differentiation during oocyte maturation remain largely unknown. At fertilization, Xenopus eggs produce a cytoplasmic Ca2+ (Ca2+ cyt) rise that lasts for several minutes, and is required for egg activation. Here, we show that during oocyte maturation Ca2+ transport effectors are tightly modulated. The plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase (PMCA) is completely internalized during maturation, and is therefore unable to extrude Ca 2+ out of the cell. Furthermore, IP3-dependent Ca 2+ release is required for the sustained Ca2+ cyt rise in eggs, showing that Ca2+ that is pumped into the ER leaks back out through IP3 receptors. This apparent futile cycle allows eggs to maintain elevated cytoplasmic Ca2+ despite the limited available Ca2+ in intracellular stores. Therefore, Ca 2+ signaling differentiates in a highly orchestrated fashion during Xenopus oocyte maturation endowing the egg with the capacity to produce a sustained Ca2+ cyt transient at fertilization, which defines the egg's competence to activate and initiate embryonic development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)514-525
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental Biology
Volume288
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Dec 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Calcium Signaling
Xenopus
Fertilization
Oocytes
Eggs
Ovum
Substrate Cycling
Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors
Aptitude
Calcium-Transporting ATPases
Mental Competency
Embryonic Development
Cell Membrane

Keywords

  • Ca signaling
  • Endocytosis
  • IP receptor
  • Oocyte maturation
  • Plasma membrane Ca ATPase
  • Xenopus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Calcium signaling differentiation during Xenopus oocyte maturation. / El-Jouni, Wassim; Jang, Byungwoo; Haun, Shirley; Machaca, Khaled.

In: Developmental Biology, Vol. 288, No. 2, 15.12.2005, p. 514-525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

El-Jouni, Wassim ; Jang, Byungwoo ; Haun, Shirley ; Machaca, Khaled. / Calcium signaling differentiation during Xenopus oocyte maturation. In: Developmental Biology. 2005 ; Vol. 288, No. 2. pp. 514-525.
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