Au-Induced Faceting of Si(5 5 12)

A. A. Baski, Khaled Saoud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The growth of Au on the stable, high-index Si(5 5 12) surface has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At very low coverages and moderate annealing temperatures (≤ 0.1 ML, 400-500°C), Au appears to decorate the underlying Si rows and form an array of rows that maintains the underlying (5 5 12) periodicity of 5.4 nm. For higher annealing temperatures and coverages, however, Au causes faceting to a number of nearby planes. The two primary facets formed at lower (∼ 0.15 ML) and higher (0.5-2 ML) coverages are the (337) and (225) planes, which are tilted 0.7° down [towards (111)] and 1.1° up from (5 5 12), respectively. Both orientations are in fact subunits of the (5 5 12) unit cell, so their presence is not surprising. In addition to these facets, two types of sawtooth morphologies composed of planes oriented further from (5 5 12) are found at very high annealing temperatures (800-900°C). These include (113)+(7 7 15) planes at very low coverage (0.05 ml) and (113)+(5 5 11) planes at higher coverage (∼ 1 ML), where (113) is tilted up by 5.3° and (7 7 15) and (5 5 11) are tilted down by 2.9° and 2.2°, respectively. Au adsorption on Si(5 5 12) therefore results in the formation of five possible facet planes: (113), (225), (337), (5 5 11), and (7 7 15).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)527-535
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cluster Science
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

flat surfaces
Annealing
Temperature
annealing
Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy
Scanning tunneling microscopy
Periodicity
Adsorption
temperature
scanning tunneling microscopy
periodic variations
adsorption
causes
Growth
cells

Keywords

  • Au
  • Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM)
  • Si surface

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Inorganic Chemistry

Cite this

Au-Induced Faceting of Si(5 5 12). / Baski, A. A.; Saoud, Khaled.

In: Journal of Cluster Science, Vol. 12, No. 3, 2001, p. 527-535.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baski, A. A. ; Saoud, Khaled. / Au-Induced Faceting of Si(5 5 12). In: Journal of Cluster Science. 2001 ; Vol. 12, No. 3. pp. 527-535.
@article{fe84c722fe3c4dd2bf23fbcea0bdc26e,
title = "Au-Induced Faceting of Si(5 5 12)",
abstract = "The growth of Au on the stable, high-index Si(5 5 12) surface has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At very low coverages and moderate annealing temperatures (≤ 0.1 ML, 400-500°C), Au appears to decorate the underlying Si rows and form an array of rows that maintains the underlying (5 5 12) periodicity of 5.4 nm. For higher annealing temperatures and coverages, however, Au causes faceting to a number of nearby planes. The two primary facets formed at lower (∼ 0.15 ML) and higher (0.5-2 ML) coverages are the (337) and (225) planes, which are tilted 0.7° down [towards (111)] and 1.1° up from (5 5 12), respectively. Both orientations are in fact subunits of the (5 5 12) unit cell, so their presence is not surprising. In addition to these facets, two types of sawtooth morphologies composed of planes oriented further from (5 5 12) are found at very high annealing temperatures (800-900°C). These include (113)+(7 7 15) planes at very low coverage (0.05 ml) and (113)+(5 5 11) planes at higher coverage (∼ 1 ML), where (113) is tilted up by 5.3° and (7 7 15) and (5 5 11) are tilted down by 2.9° and 2.2°, respectively. Au adsorption on Si(5 5 12) therefore results in the formation of five possible facet planes: (113), (225), (337), (5 5 11), and (7 7 15).",
keywords = "Au, Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Si surface",
author = "Baski, {A. A.} and Khaled Saoud",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1023/A:1012835615335",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "527--535",
journal = "Journal of Cluster Science",
issn = "1040-7278",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Au-Induced Faceting of Si(5 5 12)

AU - Baski, A. A.

AU - Saoud, Khaled

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - The growth of Au on the stable, high-index Si(5 5 12) surface has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At very low coverages and moderate annealing temperatures (≤ 0.1 ML, 400-500°C), Au appears to decorate the underlying Si rows and form an array of rows that maintains the underlying (5 5 12) periodicity of 5.4 nm. For higher annealing temperatures and coverages, however, Au causes faceting to a number of nearby planes. The two primary facets formed at lower (∼ 0.15 ML) and higher (0.5-2 ML) coverages are the (337) and (225) planes, which are tilted 0.7° down [towards (111)] and 1.1° up from (5 5 12), respectively. Both orientations are in fact subunits of the (5 5 12) unit cell, so their presence is not surprising. In addition to these facets, two types of sawtooth morphologies composed of planes oriented further from (5 5 12) are found at very high annealing temperatures (800-900°C). These include (113)+(7 7 15) planes at very low coverage (0.05 ml) and (113)+(5 5 11) planes at higher coverage (∼ 1 ML), where (113) is tilted up by 5.3° and (7 7 15) and (5 5 11) are tilted down by 2.9° and 2.2°, respectively. Au adsorption on Si(5 5 12) therefore results in the formation of five possible facet planes: (113), (225), (337), (5 5 11), and (7 7 15).

AB - The growth of Au on the stable, high-index Si(5 5 12) surface has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At very low coverages and moderate annealing temperatures (≤ 0.1 ML, 400-500°C), Au appears to decorate the underlying Si rows and form an array of rows that maintains the underlying (5 5 12) periodicity of 5.4 nm. For higher annealing temperatures and coverages, however, Au causes faceting to a number of nearby planes. The two primary facets formed at lower (∼ 0.15 ML) and higher (0.5-2 ML) coverages are the (337) and (225) planes, which are tilted 0.7° down [towards (111)] and 1.1° up from (5 5 12), respectively. Both orientations are in fact subunits of the (5 5 12) unit cell, so their presence is not surprising. In addition to these facets, two types of sawtooth morphologies composed of planes oriented further from (5 5 12) are found at very high annealing temperatures (800-900°C). These include (113)+(7 7 15) planes at very low coverage (0.05 ml) and (113)+(5 5 11) planes at higher coverage (∼ 1 ML), where (113) is tilted up by 5.3° and (7 7 15) and (5 5 11) are tilted down by 2.9° and 2.2°, respectively. Au adsorption on Si(5 5 12) therefore results in the formation of five possible facet planes: (113), (225), (337), (5 5 11), and (7 7 15).

KW - Au

KW - Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM)

KW - Si surface

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035545026&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035545026&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1023/A:1012835615335

DO - 10.1023/A:1012835615335

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 527

EP - 535

JO - Journal of Cluster Science

JF - Journal of Cluster Science

SN - 1040-7278

IS - 3

ER -