Associations among late chronotype, body mass index and dietary behaviors in young adolescents

T. Arora, Shahrad Taheri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/objectives: Levels of pediatric obesity continue to rise. Previous evidence has linked short sleep duration and/or poor sleep quality to obesity development, although objective data are limited. As adolescents transition through puberty, circadian shifts occur, resulting in sleep loss. However, little is known whether chronotype is associated with body mass index (BMI) or dietary behaviors in adolescents. We hypothesized late chronotype would be positively associated with BMI and poorer dietary behaviors. Subjects/methods: A total of 511 UK young adolescents (11-13 years) from eight secondary schools across the Midlands region (UK) participated in the Midlands Adolescent Schools Sleep Education Study (MASSES), a cross-sectional study to assess potential relationships between chronotype and BMI z-score as well as dietary habits. Height (cm) and weight (kg) were objectively measured for BMI calculation and participants completed a questionnaire to assess dietary habits. A subsample of 236 adolescents wore wrist actigraphy for 7 days to estimate average sleep duration (weekday, weekend and combined) and sleep efficiency. Results: Definitely evening chronotype was positively associated with BMI z-score compared to definitely morning chronotypes β=0.51, P<0.01, after adjustment. Higher frequency of consuming unhealthy snacks, night-time caffeine consumption and inadequate daily intake of fruit/vegetables were also associated with later chronotype (all P≤0.01). Actigraphy estimated sleep duration was an independent predictor of BMI z-score β=-0.36, P<0.001. Sleep efficiency did not predict BMI z-score after adjustment, β=-0.03, P=0.07. Conclusions: Later chronotype young adolescents are at risk of increased BMI and poorer dietary behaviors. Although short sleep duration, but not sleep efficiency, was also an independent risk factor for increased BMI, different mechanisms may be driving the late chronotype and shorter sleep duration associations with BMI in this age group. Sleep hygiene education may help adolescents to better understand the impact of sleeping habits on physical health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39-44
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jan 2015

Fingerprint

Sleep
Body Mass Index
Actigraphy
Social Adjustment
Feeding Behavior
Education
Adolescent Behavior
Snacks
Pediatric Obesity
Puberty
Caffeine
Wrist
Vegetables
Habits
Fruit
Age Groups
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Weights and Measures
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Associations among late chronotype, body mass index and dietary behaviors in young adolescents. / Arora, T.; Taheri, Shahrad.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 39, No. 1, 10.01.2015, p. 39-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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