Are you Charlie or Ahmed? Cultural pluralism in Charlie Hebdo response on Twitter

Jisun An, Haewoon Kwak, Yelena Mejova, Sonia Alonso Saenz De Oger, Braulio Gomez Fortes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We study the response to the Charlie Hebdo shootings of January 7, 2015 on Twitter across the globe. We ask whether the stances on the issue of freedom of speech can be modeled using established sociological theories, including Huntington's culturalist Clash of Civilizations, and those taking into consideration social context, including Density and Interdependence theories. We find support for Huntington's culturalist explanation, in that the established traditions and norms of one's "civilization" predetermine some of one's opinion. However, at an individual level, we also find social context to play a significant role, with non-Arabs living in Arab countries using #JeSuisAhmed ("I am Ahmed") five times more often when they are embedded in a mixed Arab/non-Arab (mention) network. Among Arabs living in the West, we find a great variety of responses, not altogether associated with the size of their expatriate community, suggesting other variables to be at play.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016
PublisherAAAI Press
Pages2-11
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781577357582
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Event10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016 - Cologne, Germany
Duration: 17 May 201620 May 2016

Other

Other10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016
CountryGermany
CityCologne
Period17/5/1620/5/16

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

An, J., Kwak, H., Mejova, Y., De Oger, S. A. S., & Fortes, B. G. (2016). Are you Charlie or Ahmed? Cultural pluralism in Charlie Hebdo response on Twitter. In Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016 (pp. 2-11). AAAI Press.

Are you Charlie or Ahmed? Cultural pluralism in Charlie Hebdo response on Twitter. / An, Jisun; Kwak, Haewoon; Mejova, Yelena; De Oger, Sonia Alonso Saenz; Fortes, Braulio Gomez.

Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016. AAAI Press, 2016. p. 2-11.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

An, J, Kwak, H, Mejova, Y, De Oger, SAS & Fortes, BG 2016, Are you Charlie or Ahmed? Cultural pluralism in Charlie Hebdo response on Twitter. in Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016. AAAI Press, pp. 2-11, 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016, Cologne, Germany, 17/5/16.
An J, Kwak H, Mejova Y, De Oger SAS, Fortes BG. Are you Charlie or Ahmed? Cultural pluralism in Charlie Hebdo response on Twitter. In Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016. AAAI Press. 2016. p. 2-11
An, Jisun ; Kwak, Haewoon ; Mejova, Yelena ; De Oger, Sonia Alonso Saenz ; Fortes, Braulio Gomez. / Are you Charlie or Ahmed? Cultural pluralism in Charlie Hebdo response on Twitter. Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016. AAAI Press, 2016. pp. 2-11
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