APPLICATION OF ESCA TO CORROSION STUDIES OF GLASSES CONTAINING SIMULATED NUCLEAR WASTES.

L. R. Pederson, M. T. Thomas, G. L. McVay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

ESCA, in combination with ion sputtering, was used to obtain compositional depth profiles of complex glasses which had been leached in DI water. The earliest and most obvious feature of aqueous attack was alkali depletion from the near surface regions of the glasses. Further corrosion was slowed by a surface buildup of various elements, which included aluminum, iron, nickel, titanium, zirconium, cerium, and neodymium. Elemental releases were calculated from the ESCA results, which were corrected for variations in the sputter rate through the reaction layer, and compared to those measured directly by ICP solution analysis. The degree of agreement between the two methods was used to assess the importance of matrix dissolution in addition to selective component leaching in the aqueous corrosion of the glasses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)732-736
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of vacuum science & technology
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Radioactive wastes
Corrosion
Glass
Neodymium
Cerium
Zirconium
Leaching
Sputtering
Dissolution
Titanium
Nickel
Iron
Aluminum
Ions
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

APPLICATION OF ESCA TO CORROSION STUDIES OF GLASSES CONTAINING SIMULATED NUCLEAR WASTES. / Pederson, L. R.; Thomas, M. T.; McVay, G. L.

In: Journal of vacuum science & technology, Vol. 18, No. 3, 04.1980, p. 732-736.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pederson, L. R. ; Thomas, M. T. ; McVay, G. L. / APPLICATION OF ESCA TO CORROSION STUDIES OF GLASSES CONTAINING SIMULATED NUCLEAR WASTES. In: Journal of vacuum science & technology. 1980 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 732-736.
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